Editor'S Choice

How the Industrial Revolution Gave Rise to Violent 'Luddites'

How the Industrial Revolution Gave Rise to Violent 'Luddites'

On a late January night in 1812, a mob hell-bent on violence stormed through the door of George Ball’s textile workshop on the outskirts of Nottingham, England. With handkerchiefs tied around their faces, the men slammed their targets with sledgehammers and fled, leaving behind five shattered knitting machines.

Liberty Bell

Liberty Bell

At a meeting of the Assembly of the Province of Pennsylvania about November 1751, the Speaker of the Pennsylvania Assembly, ordered the Superintendents (Isaac Norris, Thomas Leech and Edward Warner), to procure a bell of about 2,000 pounds in weight, from England.He asked that a Bible verse to be placed on the bell - & 34;Proclaim LIBERTY throughout all the Land unto all the inhabitants thereof& 34; (Leviticus 25:10), and stipulated that it should be delivered before the following summer.

British Sniper in Normandy

British Sniper in Normandy

British Sniper in Normandy Here we see a British sniper taking advantage of the cover provided by one of the famous Normandy hedgerows. The cameraman& 39;s position suggests that there wasn& 39;t much immediate danger, although the dead German and wrecked motorbike and tank in the lane show that the area had seen heavy fighting.

Treaty of Paris (1898): Ending the Spanish-American War

Treaty of Paris (1898): Ending the Spanish-American War

Following the Spanish defeats in Cuba and Puerto Rico, an armistice was arranged on August 12, 1898. occupation of the Philippines was recognized pending final disposition of the islands.The final treaty was concluded in Paris on December 10, 1898 and provided for the following:Spain agreed to remove all soldiers from Cuba and recognize American occupation of the area; the U.

Interview: Numantia - Recreating the Ancient Iberian World

Interview: Numantia - Recreating the Ancient Iberian World

RECOTechnology is a small game-developer studio based in Madrid, Spain. Their latest video game - Numantia - allows players to explore the conflicts between the ancient Iberians and ancient Romans...

United States v. E.C. Knight Company

United States v. E.C. Knight Company

In the early 1890s, the American Sugar Refining Company purchased stock in four other refineries, formerly competitors, including the E.C. By 1892, American Sugar Refining controlled 98 percent of the nation’s refineries.Suit was brought by the Cleveland administration, alleging that an illegal restraint of trade in interstate commerce had occurred under the terms of the Sherman Antitrust Act.