Accelerate- ARS-30 - History

Accelerate- ARS-30 - History


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Accelerate

(ARS–30: dp. 400; 1. 129'6"; b. 32'; dr. 14'; s. 12 k.; a. 2 6-pars.)

Accelerate (ARS-30) was a steam-propelled mooring tender built in 1921 by Kyle & Purdy, City Island, N.Y., as Toteco for the International Petroleum Co. Either late in 1929 or early 1930, the vessel was acquired by Elmer D. Walling of Montclair N.J. and renamed Walling. After the United States entered World War II, the Navy acquired her at New York City from Mr. Walling on 2 April 1942, classified her as a salvage vessel, ARS-30, on 11 April 1943; and simultaneously renamed her Accelerate. No conversion was deemed necessary to prepare her for Navy use. Between these last two events, she may have been used privately by the Merritt, Chapman, Scott Co. because the Navy accepted her back from the company on 5 September 1946.

Records on the ship's naval career are scarce and in some matters confusing, if not contradictory. It appears that Accelerate was assigned to the 3d Naval District throughout her service in the Navy. She was apparently operated under contract with the Navy by the Merritt, Chapman and Scott Co. in waters near New York City. Some evidence exists indicating that the salvage vessel was placed in commission on 15 March 1945, but, if so, no lo's of her service have been found, and no record of her decommissioning has survived.

The Navy declared the vessel surplus in February 1946 and her name was stricken from the Navy list on 7 February 1947. On 28 August 1947, the ship was transferred to the War Shipping, administration of the Maritime Commission for disposal.

The ship was sold in 1948 to C. Pateras and G. Glyptis of Venezuela. Soon renamed Marigo, she served several owners under the Venezuelan flag, bearing the names Marigo and George. In the late 1970's, she was registered as George and owned by Maritima Venezolana de Navegacion, S.A.


The Amiga turns 30—“Nobody had ever designed a personal computer this way&rdquo

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Journalism is prone to hyperbole, but on July 23, 1985 technology genuinely changed forever. At New York's Lincoln Center, as a full orchestra scored the evening and all its employees appeared in tuxedos, Commodore unveiled the work of its newly acquired Amiga subsidiary for the first time. The world finally saw a real Amiga 1000 and all its features. A baboon's face at 640x400 resolution felt life-changing, and icons like Blondie's Debbie Harry and Andy Warhol came onstage to demo state-of-the-art technology like a paint program.

Today, Amiga—specifically its initial Amiga 1000 computer—officially turns 30. The Computer History Museum (CHM) in Mountain View, CA will commemorate the event this weekend (July 25 and 26) with firsthand hardware exhibits, speakers, and a banquet where the Viva Amiga documentary will be shown. It's merely the most high-profile event among dozens of Amiga commemorative ceremonies across the world, from Australia to Germany to Cleveland.

What's the big deal? While things like the Apple II and TRS-80 Model 100 preceded it, the Amiga 1000 was the first true PC for creatives. As the CHM describes it, the Amiga 1000 was "a radical multimedia machine from a group of thinkers, tinkerers, and visionaries which delivered affordable graphics, animation, music, and multitasking interaction the personal computer world hadn’t even dreamt of." It pioneered desktop video and introduced PCs to countless new users, rocketing Amiga and Commodore to the top for a brief moment in the sun.

Around Ars, our remembrance of the machine has unfolded over six years, starting in 2007. Over eight parts and 25,977 words, Ars’ Jeremy Reimer outlined Amiga's journey from original idea to April 24, 1994, when the Commodore HQ in West Chester, Pennsylvania closed for the final time.

"Bringing your camera on the last day, eh, Dave?" the receptionist asked in a resigned voice.

"Yeah, well, they can't yell at me for spreading secrets any more, can they?" he replied.

His History of the Amiga attempts to explain what the device was, what it meant to its designers and users, and why, despite its relative obscurity and early demise, it continues to matter so much to the computer industry and its enthusiasts. Whether you're nostalgic or curious about this machine that many, many of your tech friends are lauding this weekend (and will continue to celebrate through the fall, when November marks 30 years since the Amiga 1000 became available to the public), consider this the best starting point we can recommend.

The entire series is linked and outlined below if you have a few hours over the coming week. At the very least, take a moment today to reflect on all the video and other Amiga-led computing aspects we take for granted today. Now if you'll excuse us, we'll need to get back to watching Amiga demo clips on YouTube for the foreseeable future working.

Part One: Genesis

Excerpt: “The story of Commodore and the Amiga was, by far, even more interesting than that of Apple or Microsoft. It is a tale of vision, of technical brilliance, dedication, and camaraderie. It is also a tale of deceit, of treachery, and of betrayal. It is a tale that has largely remained untold.”

Part Two: The birth of Amiga

Excerpt: “Jay Miner once described the feeling of being involved in the young Amiga company as being like Mickey Mouse in the movie Fantasia, creating magical broomsticks to help carry buckets of water, then being unable to stop his runaway creations as they multiplied beyond control.

It isn't known who first came up with the idea, but foam bats became an essential part of all design meetings. A person would pitch an idea, and if other engineers felt they were stupid or unnecessary, they would hit the person over the head with a bat. As Jay said, 'It didn't hurt, but the humiliation of being beaten with the bat was unbearable.' It was a lighthearted yet still serious approach, and it worked. Slowly the Amiga design began to take shape.”

Part Three: The first prototype

Excerpt: “Nobody had ever designed a personal computer this way. Most personal computers, such as the IBM PC and the Apple ][, had no custom chips inside them. All they consisted of was a simple motherboard that defined the connections between the CPU, the memory chips, the input/output bus, and the display. Such motherboards could be designed on paper and printed directly to a circuit board, ready to be filled with off-the-shelf chips. Some, like the prototypes for the Apple ][, were designed by a single person (in this case, Steve Wozniak) and manufactured by hand.

The Amiga was nothing like this.”

Part Four: Enter Commodore

Excerpt: "Commodore rented the Lincoln Center and hired a full orchestra for the Amiga announcement ceremony, which was videotaped for posterity. All Commodore employees were given tuxedoes to wear for the event: RJ Mical one-upped the rest by finding a pair of white gloves to complete his ensemble. The band played a jaunty little number with tubas and xylophones as a brilliant laser display revealed the Amiga name in its new font."

Part Five: Postlaunch blues

Excerpt: "By July 1985, Commodore had everything going for it. The Amiga computer had been demonstrated in public to rave reviews, and everyone was excited at the potential of this great technology.

That's when the problems started… by October there were only 50 Amiga 1000 units in existence, all used by Commodore for demos and internal software development. Amiga 1000 computers did not start to appear in quantity on retail shelves until mid-November 1985. This was too late to make a significant impact on the crucial holiday buying season. Most retailers make 40 percent or more of their yearly sales over the holidays, and Commodore had missed the boat."

Part Six: Stop the bleeding

Excerpt: "Commodore had lost over $300 million between September 1985 and March 1986, and over $21 million in March alone. Commodore's new CEO, Thomas Rattigan, was determined to stop the bleeding. He began three separate rounds of layoffs."

Part Seven: Game on!

Excerpt: "Amiga never lost its gaming side. The machine's 4096-color palette, stereo sampled sound, and graphics acceleration chips made it a perfect gaming platform, and it didn't take long for game companies to start taking advantage of this power."

Part Eight: The demo scene

Excerpt: "If you were the first to crack a game, you wanted to show off your feat to your friends, so crackers would add a byline with their pseudonyms on the game’s loading screen."


American History

This course covers the discovery, development, and growth of the United States. Major topics include American Indian cultures, European colonization of the Americas, and the causes and effects of the American Revolution. Geographical, economic, and political factors are explores as the key factors in the growth of the United States of America. American History I is a survey of the struggle to build the United States of America from the colonial period to the beginning of the twentieth century. By means of reading, analyzing, and applying historical data, students come to appreciate the forces that shaped our history and character as an American people. Not only are the topics of American history discussed, but students also explore research methods and determine accurate sources of data from the past. Knowing the facts and dates of history are just the beginning: each student must understand how history affects him or her.

Semester B: Expansion of a Nation

American History B begins with a study of American life before the 1929 Stock Market crash and how the Roaring Twenties influenced society in the late 19th through early 20th centuries. Students will examine the causes and consequences of the Great Depression and move on into a detailed study of World War II with an emphasis on America’s role in the conflict. The course continues with an analysis of the Cold War struggle and America’s rise as a superpower. The Civil Rights and Women’s rights movements, pollution and the environment, and American domestic and foreign policy will be examined. The course wraps up with a summary of current events and issues, including a study of the Middle East. This course begins with an assessment of life in United States pre-World War I and ends with the conflicts of the new millennium. Students look at the nation in terms of economic, social, and political trends. The experiences of the last century are summarized, including a look into the civil rights issues that have embroiled the nation in conflict. The development of the United States of America into a superpower is explored within a global context.


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The United States Navy, United States Coast Guard, and United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) use a hull classification symbol to identify their ships by type and by individual ship within a type. The system is analogous to the pennant number system that the Royal Navy and other European and Commonwealth navies use.

Military Sealift Command (MSC) is an organization that controls the replenishment and military transport ships of the United States Navy. Military Sealift Command has the responsibility for providing sealift and ocean transportation for all US military services as well as for other government agencies. It first came into existence on 9 July 1949 when the Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS) became solely responsible for the Department of Defense's ocean transport needs. The MSTS was renamed the Military Sealift Command in 1970.

Fleet Week is a United States Navy, United States Marine Corps, and United States Coast Guard tradition in which active military ships recently deployed in overseas operations dock in a variety of major cities for one week. Once the ships dock, the crews can enter the city and visit its tourist attractions. At certain hours, the public can take a guided tour of the ships. Often, Fleet Week is accompanied by military demonstrations and air shows such as those provided by the Blue Angels.

USCGC Acushnet (WMEC-167) was a cutter of the United States Coast Guard, homeported in Ketchikan, Alaska. She was originally USS Shackle (ARS-9), a Diver-class rescue and salvage ship commissioned by the United States Navy for service in World War II. She was responsible for coming to the aid of stricken vessels and received three battle stars during World War II, before a long career with the Coast Guard. Acushnet patrolled the waters of the North Pacific and was one of the last World War II era ships on active duty in the US fleet upon her retirement in 2011.

Grapple may refer to:

USS Grapple (ARS-53) is a Safeguard-class salvage ship in the United States Navy. Her home port is Norfolk, Virginia. On 13 July 2006 Grapple was decommissioned from US Navy service and converted to civilian operation by Military Sealift Command. She was redesignated as USNS Grapple.

USNS Salvor (ARS-52) is a Safeguard-class salvage ship, the second United States Navy ship of that name.

USNS Safeguard (T-ARS-50),, is the lead ship of her class and the second United States Navy ship of that name.

USNS Vindicator (T-AGOS-3) was a United States Navy Stalwart-class modified tactical auxiliary general ocean surveillance ship that was in service from 1984 to 1993. Vindicator then served in the United States Coast Guard from 1994 to 2001 as the medium endurance cutter USCGC Vindicator (WMEC-3). Since 2004, she has been in commission in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) fleet as the oceanographic research ship NOAAS Hi'ialakai.

USS Lipan (AT-85) was a Navajo-class fleet tug constructed for the United States Navy during World War II. Her purpose was to aid ships, usually by towing, on the high seas or in combat or post-combat areas, plus "other duties as assigned." She served in the Pacific Ocean and after successful support of World War II and the Korean War, her crew returned home proudly displaying two battle stars for World War II and four battle stars for their efforts during the Korean War.

USS Escape (ARS-6) was a Diver-class rescue and salvage ship commissioned by the U.S. Navy for service in World War II. She was responsible for coming to the aid of stricken vessels.

USS Shackle (ARS-9) was a Diver-class rescue and salvage ship commissioned by the U.S. Navy for service in World War II. She was responsible for coming to the aid of stricken vessels.

USS Seize (ARS-26) was a Diver-class rescue and salvage ship commissioned in the United States Navy during World War II. Her task was to come to the aid of stricken vessels.

USNS Kiska (T-AE-35), ex-USS Kiska (AE-35) was one of five ammunition ships operated by Military Sealift Command of the Naval Fleet Auxiliary Force. The ship was laid down on 8 April 1971 at Ingalls Shipbuilding, Pascagoula, Mississippi as USS Kiska (AE-35) and was launched on 11 March 1972. Originally commissioned on December 16, 1972 she was decommissioned on 1 August 1996, and that same day entered service with Military Sealift Command as USNS Kiska (T-AE-35). She continued to operate under Military Sealift Command's control until she was deactivated at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on January 15, 2011. Kiska is the eighth and final ship of the Kilauea-class ammunition ships. Kiska was disposed of by Navy title transfer to the Maritime Administration as of May 30, 2013.

USNS Henry J. Kaiser (T-AO-187) is a United States Navy replenishment oiler and the lead ship of her class. She is operated by Military Sealift Command and therefore has a "USNS" prefix for United States Naval Ship. She is named for Henry J. Kaiser (1882�), an American industrialist and shipbuilder.

USNS Grasp (T-ARS-51) is a Safeguard-class salvage ship, the second United States Navy ship of that name.

The Naval Fleet Auxiliary Force is a division of the US Navy. The 42 ships of the Military Sealift Command's Naval Fleet Auxiliary Force are the supply lines to U.S. Navy ships at sea. These ships provide virtually everything that Navy ships need, including fuel, food, ordnance, spare parts, mail and other supplies. NFAF ships enable the Navy fleet to remain at sea, on station and combat ready for extended periods of time. NFAF ships also conduct towing, rescue and salvage operations or serve as floating medical facilities. All NFAF ships are government owned and crewed by civil service mariners. Some of the ships also have a small contingent of Navy personnel aboard for operations support, supply coordination and helicopter operations.

USNS Pecos (T-AO-197) is a Henry J. Kaiser-class underway replenishment oiler operated by the Military Sealift Command to support ships of the United States Navy, and the third such ship to be named after the Pecos River.


USS Acme

Two U.S. Navy ship was named "Acme".
USS Acme MSO-508, a minesweeper, which was launched on 23 June 1955.
USS Acme AMC-61, in Accentor class minesweeper, which was launched on 31 may 1941.

USS Acme MSO - 508 was an Acme - class minesweeper acquired by the United States Navy for the task of removing mines that had been placed in the water to
Accentor Acme class USS Acme AMc - 61 a coastal minesweeper launched in 1941 USS Acme MSO - 508 a minesweeper launched in 1955 USS Abarenda IX - 131 SS Acme
USS Acme AMc - 61 was an Accentor - class coastal minesweeper in the United States Navy. Acme was laid down while still unnamed on 31 March 1941 by the
Navy vessel manned by the United States Coast Guard during World War II. Acme was an Emergency Fleet Corporation design 1047 tanker laid down by the Union
Maryland for scrapping. While still on the building ways, USS Adamant AMc - 61 was renamed USS Acme AMc - 61 on 17 May 1941. List of United States Navy ships
War I USS Advance AMc - 63 an Accentor - class minesweeper USS Advance MSO - 510 an Acme - class minesweeper This article incorporates text from the public
USS Positive AMc - 95 was an Acme - class coastal minesweeper acquired by the U.S. Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid in
USS Stalwart may refer to: USS Stalwart AMc - 105 an Acme - class coastal minesweeper later redesignated Unclassified Miscellaneous Auxiliary IX - 231
The Accentor - class minesweeper, sometimes called the Accentor Acme - class minesweeper, was a small minesweeper used by the United States Navy during World

USS Adroit AM - 509 MSO - 509 was an Acme - class minesweeper acquired by the U.S. Navy for the task of removing mines that had been placed in the water to
USS Affray AM - 511 MSO - 511 was an Acme - class minesweeper acquired by the U.S. Navy for the task of removing mines that had been placed in the water to
fourteen French navy destroyers USS Adroit AM - 82 an Adroit - class minesweeper USS Adroit MSO - 509 an Acme - class minesweeper USS Adroit SP - 248 a steam
USS Advance AM - 510 MSO - 510 was an Acme - class minesweeper acquired by the U.S. Navy for the task of removing mines that had been placed in the water to
USS Affray AMc - 112 was an Acme - class minesweeper acquired by the U.S. Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid in the water
USS MSO - 499 USS MSO - 500 USS MSO - 501 USS MSO - 502 USS MSO - 503 USS MSO - 504 USS MSO - 505 USS MSO - 506 USS MSO - 507 USS Acme MSO - 508 USS Adroit MSO - 509 USS Advance MSO - 510
The Acme was a wooden top sail schooner that was driven ashore at Seal Rocks, New South Wales while carrying timber from Camden Haven to Sydney under the
in the Great Lakes Storm of 1913 SS Henry B. Smith, built in 1906 for the Acme Transit Company, later sunk in the Great Lakes Storm of 1913 SS Anna C. Minch
in 1956 Tanker SS Acme for the United States Shipping Board in 1916 Bainbridge - class destroyers USS Paul Jones, USS Perry and USS Preble for the United
ARL - 41 USS Achomawi AT - 148 ATF - 148 USS Acme AMc - 61, AM - 508 MSO - 508 USS Acoma SP - 1228, YTB - 701 YTM - 701 USS Acontius AGP - 12 USS Acoupa SS - 310 USS Acree

American - Davidson, who quickly sold the industrial fan line to Oklahoma - based Acme Engineering Manufacturing. The international boycotts of South Africa affected
USS Gar SS - 206 a Gar - class submarine, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for the gar, a fish of the family Lepisosteidae. It was
USS Osborne DD - 295 was a Clemson - class destroyer in the United States Navy following World War I. She was named for Weedon Osborne. Osborne was laid
USS Craven DD - 70 a Caldwell - class destroyer, served in the United States Navy, and later in the Royal Navy as HMS Lewes. The second US Navy ship named
Centaur rocket stage an American rocket stage used for space launches Acme Centaur, a conversion program for the Stinson L - 13 aircraft Centaur 1849
Canada Sierra College, a community college located in Rocklin, California Acme Sierra, an American experimental aircraft built in 1948 Advanced Aeromarine
AVP - 23 USS Accelerate ARS - 30 USS Accentor AMc - 36 USS Accokeek ATA - 181 USS Accomac APB - 49 USS Achelous ARL - 1 USS Achilles ARL - 41 USS Acme AMc - 61
GB - ABC00042 - A8 - 99 where GB is the ISO 3166 - 1 country code, ABC would be the Acme Boat Company s Manufacturer Identity Code MIC 00042 would be the forty - second
USS WST - 1 was a 325 - ton salvage tug of the United States Navy during World War II. She was built by Adams Company, Berrys Bay, Sydney, Australia for
The USS Piscataqua, a screw steamer, was launched 11 June 1866 by Portsmouth Navy Yard and commissioned 21 October 1867 with Captain Daniel Ammen in

Ajax Disney a fictional company the Disney equivalent of Looney Tunes Acme Corporation Ajax Duckman, a character in the animated television series

  • USS Acme MSO - 508 was an Acme - class minesweeper acquired by the United States Navy for the task of removing mines that had been placed in the water to
  • Accentor Acme class USS Acme AMc - 61 a coastal minesweeper launched in 1941 USS Acme MSO - 508 a minesweeper launched in 1955 USS Abarenda IX - 131 SS Acme
  • USS Acme AMc - 61 was an Accentor - class coastal minesweeper in the United States Navy. Acme was laid down while still unnamed on 31 March 1941 by the
  • Navy vessel manned by the United States Coast Guard during World War II. Acme was an Emergency Fleet Corporation design 1047 tanker laid down by the Union
  • Maryland for scrapping. While still on the building ways, USS Adamant AMc - 61 was renamed USS Acme AMc - 61 on 17 May 1941. List of United States Navy ships
  • War I USS Advance AMc - 63 an Accentor - class minesweeper USS Advance MSO - 510 an Acme - class minesweeper This article incorporates text from the public
  • USS Positive AMc - 95 was an Acme - class coastal minesweeper acquired by the U.S. Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid in
  • USS Stalwart may refer to: USS Stalwart AMc - 105 an Acme - class coastal minesweeper later redesignated Unclassified Miscellaneous Auxiliary IX - 231
  • The Accentor - class minesweeper, sometimes called the Accentor Acme - class minesweeper, was a small minesweeper used by the United States Navy during World
  • USS Adroit AM - 509 MSO - 509 was an Acme - class minesweeper acquired by the U.S. Navy for the task of removing mines that had been placed in the water to
  • USS Affray AM - 511 MSO - 511 was an Acme - class minesweeper acquired by the U.S. Navy for the task of removing mines that had been placed in the water to
  • fourteen French navy destroyers USS Adroit AM - 82 an Adroit - class minesweeper USS Adroit MSO - 509 an Acme - class minesweeper USS Adroit SP - 248 a steam
  • USS Advance AM - 510 MSO - 510 was an Acme - class minesweeper acquired by the U.S. Navy for the task of removing mines that had been placed in the water to
  • USS Affray AMc - 112 was an Acme - class minesweeper acquired by the U.S. Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid in the water
  • USS MSO - 499 USS MSO - 500 USS MSO - 501 USS MSO - 502 USS MSO - 503 USS MSO - 504 USS MSO - 505 USS MSO - 506 USS MSO - 507 USS Acme MSO - 508 USS Adroit MSO - 509 USS Advance MSO - 510
  • The Acme was a wooden top sail schooner that was driven ashore at Seal Rocks, New South Wales while carrying timber from Camden Haven to Sydney under the
  • in the Great Lakes Storm of 1913 SS Henry B. Smith, built in 1906 for the Acme Transit Company, later sunk in the Great Lakes Storm of 1913 SS Anna C. Minch
  • in 1956 Tanker SS Acme for the United States Shipping Board in 1916 Bainbridge - class destroyers USS Paul Jones, USS Perry and USS Preble for the United
  • ARL - 41 USS Achomawi AT - 148 ATF - 148 USS Acme AMc - 61, AM - 508 MSO - 508 USS Acoma SP - 1228, YTB - 701 YTM - 701 USS Acontius AGP - 12 USS Acoupa SS - 310 USS Acree
  • American - Davidson, who quickly sold the industrial fan line to Oklahoma - based Acme Engineering Manufacturing. The international boycotts of South Africa affected
  • USS Gar SS - 206 a Gar - class submarine, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for the gar, a fish of the family Lepisosteidae. It was
  • USS Osborne DD - 295 was a Clemson - class destroyer in the United States Navy following World War I. She was named for Weedon Osborne. Osborne was laid
  • USS Craven DD - 70 a Caldwell - class destroyer, served in the United States Navy, and later in the Royal Navy as HMS Lewes. The second US Navy ship named
  • Centaur rocket stage an American rocket stage used for space launches Acme Centaur, a conversion program for the Stinson L - 13 aircraft Centaur 1849
  • Canada Sierra College, a community college located in Rocklin, California Acme Sierra, an American experimental aircraft built in 1948 Advanced Aeromarine
  • AVP - 23 USS Accelerate ARS - 30 USS Accentor AMc - 36 USS Accokeek ATA - 181 USS Accomac APB - 49 USS Achelous ARL - 1 USS Achilles ARL - 41 USS Acme AMc - 61
  • GB - ABC00042 - A8 - 99 where GB is the ISO 3166 - 1 country code, ABC would be the Acme Boat Company s Manufacturer Identity Code MIC 00042 would be the forty - second
  • USS WST - 1 was a 325 - ton salvage tug of the United States Navy during World War II. She was built by Adams Company, Berrys Bay, Sydney, Australia for
  • The USS Piscataqua, a screw steamer, was launched 11 June 1866 by Portsmouth Navy Yard and commissioned 21 October 1867 with Captain Daniel Ammen in
  • Ajax Disney a fictional company the Disney equivalent of Looney Tunes Acme Corporation Ajax Duckman, a character in the animated television series

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Accelerate- ARS-30 - History

Accelerate is Wentworth's Innovation and Entrepreneurship Center. Incorporated in May 2012, Accelerate hosts a series of programs and workshops with the goal of nurturing a culture of innovation and entrepreneurial thinking among students. In its first four years, more than 3,500 Wentworth students participated in Accelerate and established 650 product ideas as part of interdisciplinary teams. Students received mentoring from more than 100 alumni and professionals and 42 Accelerate teams were funded for a total of $167,000.

More recently, Kotter released Buy In (2010), A Sense of Urgency (2008) and Accelerate (2014).

Phase III trials are running with completion expected in 2016. ACCELERATE studied evacetrapib in participants with high-risk vascular disease (previous myocardial infarction, stroke or peripheral vascular disease, or several cardiovascular risk factors). An interim analysis performed in October 7 led the Data Monitoring Committee to support a recommendation to stop the study as the totality of evidence suggested that evacetrapib was unlikely to be superior to placebo. ACCENTUATE is studying patients with hyperlipidemia or diabetes.

On April 3, 2016 at the American College of Cardiology cardiologists first saw the data for Eli Lilly's ACCELERATE trial of Evacetrapib involving 12,000 patients. They were "stunned" by the result which showed there was no benefit from taking evacetrapib—434 participants who took Evacetrapib died from "cardiovascular disease, such as a heart attack or a stroke" and 444 participants who took a placebo died. The ACCELERATE trial led by Dr. Stephen J. Nicholls who observed,

Villain Accelerate released an album, Maid of Gold, on Mush Records in 2003. It was praised by The Milk Factory as "a stunning debut, twisting the natural perspective of hip-hop to open new doors and invade new spaces."

Accelerate started his 5-year-old season in the GII San Pasqual Stakes on February 3rd. Accelerate broke awkwardly, was jostled slightly between horses, and settled at the back of the pack. On the backstretch, Espinoza tried to move him through an opening on the rail to press a slow pace set by Mubtaahij. Mubtaahij, ridden by Drayden van Dyke, moved onto the rail and forced Accelerate to be checked back. Espinoza had to wait behind horses until the head of the stretch, when the rail opened for him again. Accelerate moved through the opening, took the lead and pulled away to win by 1 3/4 lengths, with a time of 1:50.58 for 1 1/16.

Then Accelerate shipped outside of California for the second time in his career to run in the GI 1 1/4 Breeders' Cup Classic on November 3rd at Churchill Downs. Accelerate drew post fourteen in a fourteen horse field. He was again reluctant to load and broke in 5th position. He stayed in fifth until the final turn when he challenged Mendelssohn for the lead and took it when they entered the stretch. He held off a challenge from Thunder Snow and a fast closing-Gunnevera to win by 1 length, with a final time of 2:02.93.

Accelerate arrived at Lane's End Farm on November 4th for a brief break and to be available for inspection by breeders before training for his final start in the GI 1 1/8 mile Pegasus World Cup on January 26th. His stud fee was set for $20,000 on November 7th

Accelerate trained up for his first attempt in a grade I race, the Breeders' Cup Dirt Mile on November 4th at Santa Anita. He finished a rallying third, only a neck behind future Horse of the Year, Gun Runner, and 3 1/2 lengths behind the winner, Tamarkuz.

He then ran in the 1 1/16 mile GII San Diego Handicap on July 22nd, where he wore blinkers for the first time and had a rider change from regular rider Tyler Baze to Victor Espinoza. He would face 2016 American Champion Three-Year-Old Male Horse Arrogate, who had not lost a race since his debut. Accelerate was driven to the lead by Victor Espinoza, and he set fractions of 23.49 for a quarter of a mile, 47.07 for half a mile, and 1:11.39 for three-fourths of a mile, while steadily separating himself from his competition. He had a 7 length lead as he entered the homestretch, and widened the margin to 8 1/2 lengths as he passed the wire, as Arrogate finished far back in fourth. His trainer, John W. Sadler, said after the race: "He trained really well Sunday up at Santa Anita and showed a lot of pop when Victor worked him from the gate, and they kept telling me it was $50,000 for second. You don't want to concede anything, but I'm surprised we won, because Arrogate is the best horse in the world."

He was entered to defend his title in the GII San Diego Handicap on July 21st at Del Mar, but he was scratched since John Sadler did not want to run his stablemate, Catalina Cruiser, and Accelerate in the same race.

Accelerate (foaled May 10, 2013) is a retired American Thoroughbred racehorse, best known for winning the 2018 Breeders' Cup Classic. He established his reputation when defeating champion Arrogate in the 2017 GII San Diego Handicap, and prior to his Breeders' Cup success won the GI Santa Anita Handicap, GI Gold Cup at Santa Anita Stakes, GI Pacific Classic Stakes, and the GI Awesome Again Stakes. He is one of three horses from the 2013 foal crop to win the Breeders' Cup Classic, along with Arrogate in 2016, and Gun Runner in 2017.

Accelerate and City of Light would have a rematch on May 27th in the GI 1 1/4 mile Gold Cup at Santa Anita. Accelerate broke well and stalked in third position as Dr. Dorr lead with City of Light in second, before Accelerate made his move turning for home and opened up a 4 1/4 length lead as he crossed the wire in front. He had a final time of 2:01.38.

USS Accelerate (ARS-30) was a salvage ship in the service of the United States Navy.

Accelerate started his 4-year-old season in the GII San Pasqual Stakes on January 1st at Santa Anita Park, where he finished second on a sloppy track, 1 1/4 lengths behind the favorite, Midnight Storm.

Records on the ship's naval career are scarce and in some matters confusing, if not contradictory. It appears that Accelerate was assigned to the 3rd Naval District throughout her service in the Navy. She was apparently operated under contract with the Navy by the Merritt, Chapman, and Scott Co. in waters near New York City. Some evidence exists indicating that the salvage vessel was placed in commission on 15 March 1945, but, if so, no logs of her service have been found, and no record of her decommissioning has survived.

Accelerate did not race until April of his 3-year-old season. He made his debut in a 6 furlong Maiden Special Weight on April 17th at Los Alamitos Racecourse, where he finished 2nd, beaten by half a length by Westbrook, but finishing a neck ahead of future champion Arrogate. He finished 4th in his next race, a 6 1/2 furlong Maiden Special Weight at Santa Anita Park on May 22nd. He then finished 3rd in a 7 furlong Maiden Special Weight at Santa Anita Park on June 18th. He broke his maiden in his fourth try in a mile Maiden Special Weight at Del Mar on July 28th, where he defeated future graded-stakes winner Curlin Road by 8 3/4 lengths.

After his win, he was the favorite in the 1 1/8 mile GII Los Alamitos Derby. Sitting in fourth position and wide throughout the race, he made a move on the final turn to challenge Blackjackcat, as Semper Fortis took the advantage on the rail. Semper Fortis was in the lead for most of the long homestretch, but Accelerate gradually wore him down to win by a head. Accelerate had to survive a 13 minute stewards' inquiry for bumping Blackjackcat near the wire.

He next ran in the 1 1/8 mile GII Oaklawn Handicap on April 13th. He broke well, and moved up to third, with Malibu Stakes and Triple Bend Handicap winner City of Light sitting directly behind him. On the far turn, Accelerate moved up to take the lead, under strong driving from Espinoza, while City of Light moved up easily without asking from his jockey, Drayden van Dyke. City of Light pulled a length in front, but Accelerate continued to battle from the inside to close the margin to a neck. Sadler said after the race: "First time out of town, and I thought he ran a great race, I was pleased. Remember, it was a handicap, and we were giving away the weight."

To accelerate is to have acceleration: the rate of change of velocity of an object with respect to time.


The Pandemic Will Accelerate History Rather Than Reshape It

We are going through what by every measure is a great crisis, so it is natural to assume that it will prove to be a turning point in modern history. In the months since the appearance of COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus, analysts have differed over the type of world the pandemic will leave in its wake. But most argue that the world we are entering will be fundamentally different from what existed before. Some predict the pandemic will bring about a new world order led by China others believe it will trigger the demise of China’s leadership. Some say it will end globalization others hope it will usher in a new age of global cooperation. And still others project that it will supercharge nationalism, undermine free trade, and lead to regime change in various countries—or all of the above.

But the world following the pandemic is unlikely to be radically different from the one that preceded it. COVID-19 will not so much change the basic direction of world history as accelerate it. The pandemic and the response to it have revealed and reinforced the fundamental characteristics of geopolitics today. As a result, this crisis promises to be less of a turning point than a way station along the road that the world has been traveling for the past few decades.

It is too soon to predict when the crisis itself will end. Whether in six, 12, or 18 months, the timing will depend on the degree to which people follow social-distancing guidelines and recommended hygiene the availability of quick, accurate, and affordable testing, antiviral drugs, and a vaccine and the extent of economic relief provided to individuals and businesses.

Yet the world that will emerge from the crisis will be recognizable. Waning American leadership, faltering global cooperation, great-power discord: all of these characterized the international environment before the appearance of COVID-19, and the pandemic has brought them into sharper-than-ever relief. They are likely to be even more prominent features of the world that follows.

POST-AMERICAN WORLD

One characteristic of the current crisis has been a marked lack of U.S. leadership. The United States has not rallied the world in a collective effort to confront either the virus or its economic effects. Nor has the United States rallied the world to follow its lead in addressing the problem at home. Other countries are looking after themselves as best they can or turning to those past the peak of infection, such as China, for assistance.

But if the world that follows this crisis will be one in which the United States dominates less and less—it is almost impossible to imagine anyone today writing about a “unipolar moment”—this trend is hardly new. It has been apparent for at least a decade.

To some degree, this is a result of what Fareed Zakaria described as “the rise of the rest” (and of China in particular), which brought a decline in the United States’ relative advantage even though its absolute economic and military strength continued to grow. But even more than that, it is a result of faltering American will rather than declining American capacity. President Barack Obama oversaw a pullback from Afghanistan and the Middle East. President Donald Trump has employed mostly economic power to confront foes. But he has essentially ended the U.S. presence in Syria, and seeks to do the same in Afghanistan, and, perhaps more significant, has shown little interest either in alliances or in maintaining the United States’ traditional leading role in addressing major transnational issues.

The prospect of this change was a big part of the appeal of Trump’s “America first” message, which promised that the United States would be stronger and more prosperous if it did less abroad and focused its energies on domestic issues. Implicit in this view was the assumption that much of what the United States did in the world was wasteful, unnecessary, and unconnected to domestic well-being. For many Americans, the pandemic will likely reinforce this view despite the fact that it should instead highlight how domestic well-being is affected by the rest of the world the United States, they will say, will have to focus on righting itself and devote resources to needs at home rather than abroad, to butter rather than guns. That is a false choice, as the country needs and can afford both, but it is likely to be argued all the same.

Just as consequential as U.S. policy choices is the power of America’s example. Long before COVID-19 ravaged the earth, there had already been a precipitous decline in the appeal of the American model. Thanks to persistent political gridlock, gun violence, the mismanagement that led to the 2008 global financial crisis, the opioid epidemic, and more, what America represented grew increasingly unattractive to many. The federal government’s slow, incoherent, and all too often ineffective response to the pandemic will reinforce the already widespread view that the United States has lost its way.

ANARCHICAL SOCIETY

A pandemic that begins in one country and spreads with great velocity around the world is the definition of a global challenge. It is also further evidence that globalization is a reality, not a choice. The pandemic has ravaged open and closed countries, rich and poor, East and West. What is missing is any sign of a meaningful global response. (Newton’s law—that for every action there is an opposite and equal reaction—has apparently been suspended.) The near irrelevance of the World Health Organization, which should be central to meeting the threat at hand, speaks volumes to the poor state of global governance.

But while the pandemic has made this reality especially obvious, the underlying trends long preceded it: the emergence of global challenges that no country, no matter how powerful, can successfully contend with on its own—and the failure of global organizations to keep up with these challenges. Indeed, the gap between global problems and the capacity to meet them goes a long way toward explaining the scale of the pandemic. The sad but inescapable truth is that although the phrase “international community” is used as if it already existed, it is mostly aspirational, applying to few aspects of geopolitics today. This will not change anytime soon.

The principal responses to the pandemic have been national or even subnational, not international. And once the crisis passes, the emphasis will shift to national recovery. In this context, it is hard to see much enthusiasm for, say, tackling climate change, particularly if it remains viewed—incorrectly—as a distant problem that can be shelved in favor of addressing more immediate ones.

One reason for this pessimism is that cooperation between the world’s two most powerful countries is necessary to tackle most global challenges, yet U.S.-Chinese relations have been deteriorating for years. The pandemic is exacerbating friction between the two countries. In Washington, many hold the Chinese government responsible, thanks to its weeks of cover-up and inaction, including failing to promptly lock down Wuhan, the city where the outbreak started, and allowing thousands of infected people to leave and spread the virus farther. China’s attempt now to portray itself as offering a successful model for coping with the pandemic and to use this moment as an opportunity to expand its influence around the world will only add to American hostility. Meanwhile, nothing about the current crisis will change China’s view that the U.S. presence in Asia is a historical anomaly or reduce its resentment of U.S. policy on a range of issues, including trade, human rights, and Taiwan.

The idea of “decoupling” the two economies had gained considerable traction before the pandemic, driven by fears in the United States that it was becoming too dependent on a potential adversary for many essential goods and overly susceptible to Chinese espionage and intellectual property theft. The impetus to decouple will grow as a result of the pandemic, and only in part because of concerns about China. There will be renewed focus on the potential for interruption of supply chains along with a desire to stimulate domestic manufacturing. Global trade will partly recover, but more of it will be managed by governments rather than markets.

The resistance across much of the developed world to accepting large numbers of immigrants and refugees, a trend that had been visible for at least the past half decade, will also be intensified by the pandemic. This will be in part out of concern over the risk of importing infectious disease, in part because high unemployment will make societies wary of accepting outsiders. This opposition will grow even as the number of displaced persons and refugees—already at historic levels—will continue to increase significantly as economies can no longer support their populations.

The result will be both widespread human suffering and greater burdens on states that can ill afford them. State weakness has been a significant global problem for decades, but the economic toll of the pandemic will create even more weak or failing states. This will almost certainly be exacerbated by a mounting debt problem: public and private debt in much of the world was already at unprecedented levels, and the need for government spending to cover health-care costs and support the unemployed will cause debt to skyrocket. The developing world in particular will face enormous requirements it cannot meet, and it remains to be seen whether developed countries will be willing to provide help given demands at home. There is a real potential for aftershocks—in India, in Brazil and Mexico, and throughout Africa—that could interfere with global recovery.

The spread of COVID-19 to and through Europe has also highlighted the loss of momentum of the European project. Countries have mostly responded individually to the pandemic and its economic effects. But the process of European integration had run out of steam long before this crisis—as Brexit demonstrated especially clearly. The principal question in the post-pandemic world is how much the pendulum will continue to swing from Brussels to national capitals, as countries question whether control over their own borders could have slowed the virus’s spread.

The pandemic is likely to reinforce the democratic recession that has been evident for the past 15 years. There will be calls for a larger government role in society, be it to constrain movement of populations or provide economic help. Civil liberties will be treated by many as a casualty of war, a luxury that cannot be afforded in a crisis. Meanwhile, threats posed by illiberal countries such as Russia, North Korea, and Iran will still exist once the pandemic does not indeed, they may well have increased while attention was trained elsewhere.

A WORLD IN EVEN GREATER DISARRAY

More than three years ago, I published a book titled A World in Disarray. It described a global landscape of increased great-power rivalry, nuclear proliferation, weak states, surging refugee flows, and growing nationalism, along with a reduced U.S. role in the world. What will change as a result of the pandemic is not the fact of disarray but the extent.

Ideally, the crisis would bring renewed commitment to building a more robust international order, much as the cataclysm of World War II led to arrangements that promoted peace, prosperity, and democracy for nearly three-quarters of a century. Such an order would include greater cooperation to monitor outbreaks of infectious diseases and deal with their consequences, as well as greater willingness to address climate change, set rules for cyberspace, assist forced migrants, and tackle proliferation and terrorism.

But there is little reason to believe the past will repeat itself after this latest global calamity. The world today is simply not conducive to being shaped. Power is distributed in more hands, both state and nonstate, than ever before. Consensus is mostly absent. New technologies and challenges have outpaced the collective ability to contend with them. No single country enjoys the standing the United States did in 1945.


Conclusions

ARS in children is a common entity and most commonly occurs in the context of a URI. When illness extends beyond 7–10 days, many agree that a bacterial infection is likely. History and type of symptoms as well as their duration are the cornerstone of the clinical diagnosis (Fig. 2). This is supported by characteristic findings on physical examination. In most cases, this is a self-limited process, and treatment with antibiotics has been shown to accelerate resolution. Whether more speedy recovery provides enough benefit as compared to the disadvantage of the risks associated with frequent antibiotic prescriptions remains to be clarified. Intranasal steroids, nasal irrigations, antihistamines, decongestants, and mucolytics are all utilized for ancillary therapy and are supported by variable degrees of evidence. Because the evidence supporting these ancillary therapies is scanty in children, there is no strong formal recommendation for their use. Early recognition and diagnosis of orbital and intracranial complications can limit management to intravenous antibiotic therapy, with surgical intervention reserved for more aggressive cases.

Acute rhinosinusitis. The diagnosis of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis in children is usually made on clinical grounds based on nasal symptoms (nasal drainage, congestion, and cough) and their duration. In the context of an upper respiratory tract infection, most would agree that ABRS can be diagnosed if the symptoms do not resolve within 10 days or worsen after an initial improvement. Some children also present with ABRS without an antecedent URI, and their symptoms tend to be more severe (fever, purulent rhinorrhea, facial pain)


Accelerate- ARS-30 - History

This USS Accelerate ARS-30 License Plate Frame is proudly made in the USA at our facilities in Scottsboro, Alabama. Each of our MilitaryBest U.S. Navy Frames feature top and bottom Poly Coated Aluminum strips that are printed using sublimation which gives these quality automobile military frames a beautiful high gloss finish.

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Accelerate- ARS-30 - History

Welcome from Bill Meyers - ARS President:

On behalf of the thousands of rhododendron enthusiasts worldwide "welcome to our web site." Here you will find valuable resources which enable you to learn more about the selection and care of rhododendrons. We hope this will encourage you to explore all that the genus Rhododendron (which includes azaleas) has to offer, and you will include these wonderful plants in your garden.

"Take a look" at what we do in the Society.

Seed Exchange Now Open for Sales
Seeds collected by Society members are offered for sale at the 2021 ARS seed exchange. Until March 15 only members of the American Rhododendron Society may order seed. After March 15 anyone may purchase seed. View the seed list and order online at the ARS seed exchange page.

Virtual ARS Fall Conference
Register for the ARS Fall Conference to be held online October 23 - 24, 2021. The "Fall into Gardening" event features interesting talks from knowledgeable speakers, including plant hunter Dr. Hartwig Schepker from Germany, nurseryman David Millais from England, award-winning photographer David Sellars from British Columbia, and popular presenters Don Hyatt and Don Wallace from the U.S. Registration, program schedule and talk summaries.

2021 Gold & Silver Medals Awarded
The ARS takes great pleasure in presenting its 2021 Gold Medal honors to Jack Looye and John Weagle of the RSC Atlantic Region Chapter and to Ann Mangels of the Mason Dixon Chapter. Silver Medal honorees are Sherla Bertlemann of the Hawaii Chapter and June Bouchard and John Deniseger of the Nanaimo Chapter. View the honors citations.


Informative articles about:
- rhododendron & azalea culture,
- propagation,
- hybridizing,
- private & public gardens,
- plant portraits,
- companion plants,
- plant hunting exploration,
- rhododendron research,
- and much more.

ARS Next-Generation Podcasts
Listen to "For the Love of Rhododendron" audio podcasts. In the first of a series of podcasts we learn about the life experiences of ARS members, how random twists and turns in their lives led them to discover their love of Rhododendron, and how the podcast can inspire and support others embarking on their own journey into the vast, uncharted territory that is genus Rhododendron. Podcast index

Rhododendron International Volume 6
Volume 6 of this online journal contains a series of articles that describe most of the rhododendron species that are commonly grown. Each article contains a brief summary about the cultural potential and characteristics of the species, their general identifying taxonomic features, their cultural aspects, and a flower photo image. Read issues.


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