Versailles

Versailles


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  • View of the Palace and Gardens of Versailles.

    PATEL Pierre (1604 - 1676)

  • View of the Palace and Gardens of Versailles (detail).

    PATEL Pierre (1604 - 1676)

  • View of the Palace and Gardens of Versailles (detail).

    PATEL Pierre (1604 - 1676)

  • View of the Palace and Gardens of Versailles (detail).

    PATEL Pierre (1604 - 1676)

To close

Title: View of the Palace and Gardens of Versailles.

Author : PATEL Pierre (1604 - 1676)

Creation date : 1668

Date shown:

Dimensions: Height 115 - Width 161

Technique and other indications: Oil on canvas

Storage location: National Museum of the Palace of Versailles (Versailles) website

Contact copyright: © Photo RMN-Grand Palais (Palace of Versailles) / Gérard Blot

Picture reference: 96-001865 / MV765

View of the Palace and Gardens of Versailles.

© Photo RMN-Grand Palais (Palace of Versailles) / Gérard Blot

To close

Title: View of the Palace and Gardens of Versailles (detail).

Author : PATEL Pierre (1604 - 1676)

Creation date : 1668

Date shown:

Dimensions: Height 0 - Width 0

Technique and other indications: Oil on canvas

Storage location: National Museum of the Palace of Versailles (Versailles) website

Contact copyright: © Photo RMN-Grand Palais (Palace of Versailles) / Daniel Arnaudet

Picture reference: 84-000903 / MV765

View of the Palace and Gardens of Versailles (detail).

© Photo RMN-Grand Palais (Palace of Versailles) / Daniel Arnaudet

To close

Title: View of the Palace and Gardens of Versailles (detail).

Author : PATEL Pierre (1604 - 1676)

Creation date : 1668

Date shown:

Dimensions: Height 0 - Width 0

Technique and other indications: Oil on canvas

Storage location: National Museum of the Palace of Versailles (Versailles) website

Contact copyright: © Photo RMN-Grand Palais (Palace of Versailles) / Daniel Arnaudet / Gérard Blot

Picture reference: 84-000902 / MV765

View of the Palace and Gardens of Versailles (detail).

© Photo RMN-Grand Palais (Palace of Versailles) / Daniel Arnaudet / Gérard Blot

To close

Title: View of the Palace and Gardens of Versailles (detail).

Author : PATEL Pierre (1604 - 1676)

Creation date : 1668

Date shown:

Dimensions: Height 0 - Width 0

Technique and other indications: Oil on canvas

Storage location: National Museum of the Palace of Versailles (Versailles) website

Contact copyright: © Photo RMN-Grand Palais (Palace of Versailles) / Daniel Arnaudet

Picture reference: 84-000907 / MV765

View of the Palace and Gardens of Versailles (detail).

© Photo RMN-Grand Palais (Palace of Versailles) / Daniel Arnaudet

Publication date: December 2012

Historical context

The mere sight of these buildings evokes absolutism and classicism. Versailles is today a constitutive, immovable and timeless element of the "French national novel". The painting by Pierre Patel, a classic oil on canvas of modest size showing the fragmentary and unfinished palace as it appears in 1668, is therefore particularly interesting.

On this date, the personal reign of Louis XIV had only just begun. The existing arrangements in 1668, and therefore visible in this painting, reflect the priorities of the monarch: the gardens are designed, organized and green, the cave of Thétys, a place of relaxation, is present (square-shaped building to the left of the main entrance, topped with sculptures). Patel's canvas recalls that, until 1789, Versailles was an eternal site where "there is not a place that has not been changed ten times", in the words of Princess Palatine. The palace presented here is therefore the one the sovereign wants to show: a residence, but also an instrument of power and prestige.

Image Analysis

The painting is organized around a central axis materialized by the canal, the Latona basin (even if it has not yet received its statues, begun in the same year of the painting), the pavilion of Louis XIII, the center of which will be occupied by the king's chamber from 1701, the Marble court and the future avenue de Paris.
This east-west line creates a real gap in the relief, moreover clearly exaggerated by the painter to show that the Sun King dominates nature: the hills seem to be pushed back by the basin, the marshes disappear in favor of formal gardens arranged by Le Nôtre from 1662. This axis dissolves in the distance in the blur of the landscape, affirming the infinity of royal power. Likewise, in the foreground, it explodes into a multitude of paths, giving the impression of radiating and weaving a parallel with the sun, a symbol chosen by the king as early as 1654.

The theme of the sun is taken up in the very organization of the painting: the chosen east-west axis recalls the diurnal course of the star. From the chosen point of view, panorama overhanging all the buildings, the strict French gardens and the rigor of its organization, the painting appears geometric, almost a "cold machine of glory" (J. Cornette). To humanize the canvas, Patel featured a procession entering the palace in the lower right corner of the canvas.

The only human presence in the painting is organized around the king's coach, reminding us that the latter is the court's center of gravity, starting in 1668. Curiously, the painting shows no workers, no construction sites, even though close 2% of the kingdom's expenditure is devoted to the beautification of the palace and that in 1685, according to a courtier, more than 36,000 people worked there. This absence is not explained only by the end of the first phase of expansion (1664-1668), and the priority then given to the War of Devolution (1667-1668). The painter shows that it is through the king that the palace is organized and built; he and his courtiers alone are worthy of being immortalized.

The colors chosen also tend to humanize the painting. Patel usually paints uncrowded ruins. It is through the play of warm colors that he manages to give them a peaceful atmosphere. The same process is applied for Versailles: the ocher of buildings and terraces lit by sunlight, as well as the clear and reassuring sky, tend to attenuate the cold and majestic aspect of the composition.

Interpretation

Why immortalize the castle when the constructions are only in their infancy?

From the start of his personal reign, long before actually settling there (1682), Louis XIV made this place a symbol of his power, a "reliquary of absolutism" (J. Cornette). By including this painting in a set of paintings including Fontainebleau, the Sun King seeks to anchor his reign in the lineage of his predecessors, and in particular of François Ier. It is interesting to draw a parallel between this painting by Pierre Patel and the portrait of Louis XIV in coronation costume painted by Hyacinthe Rigaud. The latter spreads the idea of ​​the power of the king through his demeanor and his regalia.

Likewise, Patel’s painting conveys the idea of ​​the king’s power through his works, notably the largest of them, Versailles. Rigaud's painting was to be sent to the court of Philip V of Spain, to remind the Bourbon of the majesty of his grandfather. We can assume that the vocation of this painting was not to remain in the palace. These paintings "make the grandeur of royal power burst out in the eyes of all", to use Bossuet's words. Being two commissions, they also recall that art, in the XVIIe century, lives on the subsidies of the sovereign, provider of pensions and offices, and submits to his tastes and demands. These lead to many representations of the palace in Patel's style, such as The Orangery of the Palace of Versailles by Martin des Batailles or the various paintings by his brother, Pierre-Denis Martin (The Palace of Versailles, 1722).

After the aura of prestige and power in Louisiana, the Revolution adorned it with a negative and sulphurous aura, which continued throughout the 19th century.e century, despite the success of the Museum of French History inaugurated by Louis-Philippe in June 1837. It was not until the XXe century for artists to truly appropriate the palace. The latter enters popular culture: it is the setting for blockbuster films like Marie Antoinette (S. Coppola, 2006), while opening up to contemporary art (Murakami in 2010).

  • Versailles
  • architecture
  • Louis XIV
  • absolute monarchy
  • garden
  • Le Nôtre (André)
  • Great Century

Bibliography

Thierry BAJOU, Painting in Versailles, Seventeenth century, Paris, R.M.N., 2000.

Joël CORNETTE (dir.), Versailles, the power of stone, Paris, Tallandier, 2006.

Nathalie COURAL, The Patels: Pierre Patel (1605-1676) and his sons, Paris, Arthéna, 2001.

Vincent MAROTEAUX, Versailles, the king and his domain, Paris, Picard, 2000.

Jean-François SOLNON, History of Versailles, Paris, Perrin, coll. "Tempus", 2003.

To cite this article

Baptiste LOY, "Versailles"


Video: M83 - Outro Versailles Theme Vinyl Rip


Comments:

  1. Faezuru

    I think, that you have deceived.

  2. Filmore

    Few feelings .. but beautiful ...

  3. Scaffeld

    remarkably, this is the fun play

  4. Kazralkree

    Sounds quite seductive



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