Doyen DD- 280 - History

Doyen DD- 280 - History


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Doyen

Charles A. Doyen, born in New Hampshire 3 September 1859, was a member of the Naval Academy class of 1881, later commissioned second lieutenant in the Marine Corps. He organized and commanded the 5th Regiment in World War I, and in France took command of the 4th Brigade, composed of the 5th and 6th Regiments and the 6th Gun Battalion. His devoted service training this brigade broke his health, and he was forced to return to the United States, where he died 6 October 1918. But his brigade went on to win historic victories at Chateau Thierry and in Belleau Wood. Doyen's contribution to these victories was recognized by the posthumous award of the Distinguished Service Medal.

(DD-280: dp. 1,190 1. 314'5" b. 31'8", dr. 9'3"; s. 35
k.; cpl. 120; a. 1 4", 2 3", 1 21" tt.; cl. Clemson)

Doyen (DD-280) was launched 26 July 1919 by Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corp., Squantum, Mass.; sponsored by Miss F. E. Doyen, daughter of Brigadier General Doyen; and commissioned 17 December 1919, Commander J. H. Klein, Jr., in command.

Doyen arrived at San Diego 15 March 1920 to join the Pacific Fleet in local operations. Placed in active reserve status 17 August, she participated in local exercises and reserve training until placed out of commission 8 June 1922.

Doyen was recommissioned 26 September 1923 and resumed a schedule of training and tactical exercises along the west coast in the Canal Zone, and the Hawaiian Islands. She sailed from San Diego 20 August to escort HUMS Tama and to provide radio compass and communication for a nonstop west coast-to-Hawaii flight. Exercises were again conducted in the Canal Zone and the Caribbean in 1926, and later that year Doyen cruised to Bremerton for overhaul and to Ketchikan, Alaska, and Duncan Bay, British Columbia, for visits.

Doyen sailed 26 April 1927 for the east coast to participate in joint Army-Navy maneuvers at Newport. She returned to the west coast 26 June and resumed training operations and tactical exercises with the Battle Fleet on the west coast, out of Pearl Harbor and in the Canal Zone. Doyen was decommissioned 25 February 1930 and scrapped 20 December 1930 in accordance with the London Treaty for the limitation of naval armaments.


Charles Augustus Doyen

Topics. This memorial is listed in this topic list: War, World I.

Location. 43° 12.585′ N, 71° 32.283′ W. Marker is in Concord, New Hampshire, in Merrimack County. Memorial is at the intersection of N Main Street (U.S. 3) and Pitman Street, on the right when traveling east on N Main Street. Marker is located at the southeast corner of the original Merrimack County Superior Court building. Marker is a few hundred feet west of North Main Street. The marker was moved in 2018 from it's previous location at the northwest corner of the court property to make way for a new building on the property. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 5 Court Street, Concord NH 03301, United States of America. Touch for directions.

Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Site of Rumford Garrison No. 5 (about 500 feet away, measured

in a direct line) Mary Baker Eddy House (about 600 feet away) Site of First Block House (about 600 feet away) The Reuben Foster House (about 600 feet away) Site of Home of Edward H. Rollins (about 800 feet away) State Capitol (approx. 0.2 miles away) New Hampshire's Presidential Primary (approx. 0.2 miles away) In Grateful Tribute (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Concord.

More about this marker. Marker is a large metal tablet mounted on a 4-foot tall, chiseled granite slab.

Regarding Charles Augustus Doyen. Brigadier General Doyen's contribution to World War I victories in France was recognized by the posthumous award of the Navy Distinguished Service Medal, the first to ever be awarded.

Also see . . .
1. Brigadier General Charles Augustus Doyen.
Charles A. Doyen graduated from the United States Naval Academy in the class of 1881. He was commissioned Second Lieutenant in the Marine Corps in 1883, and afterward served in many seas and countries with both the Atlantic and Pacific Fleets. From 26 October to 8 November 1917, he served as Commanding General, US 2d Division(RA), the first Marine officer to command a US Army division. His devoted service

broke his health, and he was forced to return to the United States, where he died on 6 October 1918. But the 4th Brigade went on to win a historic victory in Belleau Wood. (Submitted on April 5, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.)

2. Charles Augustus Doyen.
Navy Distinguished Service Medal
The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Navy Distinguished Service Medal (Posthumously) to Brigadier General Charles Augustus Doyen, United States Marine Corps, for exceptionally meritorious and distinguished services. By reason of his abilities and personal efforts, Brigadier General Doyen brought this brigade to the very high state of efficiency which enabled it to successfully resist the German Army in the Chateau-Thierry sector and Belleau Woods. The strong efforts on his part for nearly a year, undermined his health, and necessitated his being invalided to the United States before having the opportunity to command the brigade in action, but his work was shown by the excellent service rendered by the brigade, not only at Belleau Woods, but during the entire campaign when they fought in many battles. (Submitted on April 5, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.)

3. BG Charles Augustus Doyen.
As Brigadier-General he was chosen to command the first brigade of Marines that was sent to France, and it was under his

command that the Marines received the vigorous training that proved such a fine preparation for their later glorious exploits.
Buried in Arlington National Cemetery, Section 5, Site 7030 (Submitted on April 5, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.)

4. USS Doyen.
Two ships of the United States Navy have been named USS Doyen for Charles A. Doyen:
USS Doyen (DD-280), a Clemson-class destroyer, commissioned in 1919 and decommissioned in 1930.
USS Doyen (APA-1) (originally AP-2), a transport, commissioned in 1943 and decommissioned in 1946. (Submitted on April 5, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.)


Construction and career

Doyen, named for Charles A. Doyen, was launched 26 July 1919 by Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Squantum, Massachusetts sponsored by Miss F. E. Doyen, daughter of Brigadier General Doyen and commissioned 17 December 1919, Commander J. H. Klein, Jr., in command. Doyen arrived at San Diego, California 15 March 1920 to join the Pacific Fleet in local operations. Placed in active reserve status 17 August, she participated in local exercises and reserve training until placed out of commission 8 June 1922.

Doyen was recommissioned 26 September 1923 and resumed a schedule of training and tactical exercises along the west coast, in the Panama Canal Zone, and the Hawaiian Islands. She sailed from San Diego 20 August to escort HIJMS Tama and to provide radio compass and communication for a nonstop west coast-to-Hawaii flight. Exercises were again conducted in the Canal Zone and the Caribbean in 1926, and later that year Doyen cruised to Bremerton, Washington for overhaul and to Ketchikan, Alaska, and Duncan Bay, British Columbia, for visits.

Doyen sailed 26 April 1927 for the east coast to participate in joint Army-Navy maneuvers at Newport, Rhode Island. She returned to the west coast 25 June and resumed training operations and tactical exercises with the Battle Fleet on the west coast, out of Pearl Harbor and in the Canal Zone. Doyen was decommissioned 25 February 1930 and scrapped 20 December 1930 in accordance with the London Naval Treaty for the limitation of naval armaments.


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Laststandonzombieisland

Here at LSOZI, we take off every Wednesday for a look at the old steam/diesel navies of the 1833-1954 time period and will profile a different ship each week. These ships have a life, a tale all their own, which sometimes takes them to the strangest places. – Christopher Eger

Warship Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2021: The Jeep of The Deep

Here we see USCG-6, one of the hardy members of the skull-and-crossbones emblazoned Coast Guard “Match Box Fleet” that rode shotgun in the shallows off Normandy during the Neptune/Overlord landings in June 1944. Unlikely– and quite frankly very dangerous– vessels, these 83-foot patrol boats provided unsung service not only during WWII but for generations after.

The Coast Guard’s first modern 20th Century mid-sized offshore vessels, the massive 203-vessel 75-foot “six-bitter” patrol boats, were a child of the Prohibition-era crackdown on rumrunners and bootleggers. However, these cabin cruiser-style all-wooden boats were some of the slowest boats in the sea. Equipped with two 6-cylinder gasoline engines, they could make 15.7 knots– on a calm sea and with a light load.

A 75-foot Coast Guard boat, CG-242, at Boston in 1928, looking like it is wide open. Boston Public Library Leslie Jones Collection

By the 1930s and with the rapid expansion in the number of powerboats in consumers’ hands, the Coast Guard ordered 19 so-called � series” patrol boats with speed as a requirement. These craft, built by five different yards in four different types, were an important evolutionary step, not only for the USCG but also by the Navy, who about the same time was looking to get into the PT boat game. Shallow-draft wooden-hulled boats with streamlined cabins, they were packed with multiple high-octane engines below deck with the goal of breaking 20+ knots with ease.

CG 441, one of the two experimental � series” 72 footers built by the service in the 1930s. “New Coast Guard boat capable of 35 miles an hour. Washington, D.C., May 17, 1937. One of the fastest things afloat, the new U.S. Coast Guard patrol boat #441 was put thru its paces on the Potomac River today for the benefit of treasury officials. The cruiser, which is one of eight to placed in law enforcement and life-saving service of the Coast Guard, is powered with four 1,600 horsepower motors and is capable of doing 35 miles an hour.” This craft, built by Chance Marine Construction in Annapolis, would serve on the sea frontier in WWII and be sold in 1947 for scrap. Photo. LOC LC-DIG-hec-22721

By 1941, the Coast Guard had settled on a new design following lessons learned by the � series.”

The original 83 footer plan

Designed to use a pair of large, supped-up gasoline engines, the agency ordered 40 of these new 83-foot crafts on 19 March 1941 from Wheeler Shipyard in Brooklyn. Powered by two 600hp Hall Scott Defenders, it was expected they could make 20.6 knots at delivery. Armament was slight, just a manually loaded 1-pounder (37mm) gun forward, and a pair of .30-06 Lewis guns on the wheelhouse wings.

With a plywood interior separated by three bulkheads sandwiched between a Cedar/Oak hull and a wood deck, the crew spaces on an 83 were described by one former crewman as “a dog kennel almost big enough for 14 men.”

The first boats of the series, as it turned out, were very different from what the class would soon evolve to become. Designed to use a smooth prefabricated Everdur bronze wheelhouse, as wartime material crunches came to play just 135 hulls would have these, the rest making do with a flat and angular plywood affair. In a below-deck change, after the first five hulls, the powerplant changed to a pair of the Sterling Engine Company’s TCG-8 “Viking II” engine, a beast referred to by Engine Labs today as the “World’s Largest Inline Gasoline Engine.”

The TCG-8 was an inline-eight-cylinder, four-stroke engine, which consumed gasoline… and lots of it. An undersquare design, the engine featured an 8.00-inch bore and 9.00-inch stroke, for a total displacement of 3,619.1 cubic inches, or 59.3 liters, making it one of, if not the largest inline gasoline engine in the world.

The engine itself was relatively compact, at 12 feet, 2-9/16 inches long and only 44-9/16 inches wide, which allowed the two engines to fit comfortably side-by-side in the 83-footer’s hull. Housed in a gray-iron block, the crankshaft was a forged chromoly steel piece, with separately attached counterweights, which were affixed to the crankshaft via a dovetail and bolts. There were nine traditional babbit-style bearings, 4.00 inches in diameter, which measured 2.75 inches in width on eight journals, with the thrust bearing measuring a beefy 3.437 inches wide

Sterling was known among cabin cruiser builders in the 1930s and the Viking II was sold to power 60- and 70-footers of the day. The USCG’s 83 footers used two such engines, the same setup used in the 95-foot MV Passing Jack in the above ad.

Working on a Viking below the deck of an 83 in 1942. William Vandivert/LIFE

In all, 230 of these boats would be constructed for the Coast Guard and another 12 for overseas allies (19 units originally delivered to the USCG were also transferred). The initial 1941 contract was for $42,450 per hull, a cost that would rise to $62,534 by 1944 due to the increasing sensor and armament load.

By the end of the war, these boats were carrying depth charges aft, Mousetrap ASW projectors forward, and a 20mm Oerlikon as well as a SO-2 radar and QBE sonar when fully equipped. That’s a lot for an officer and a 13-man crew to take care of.

The general wartime plan, extracted from U.S. Coast Guard Cutters & Crafts of World War II by Robert Scheina

All were numbered 83300 through 83529, with corresponding (and confusing) hull numbers CG 450 through CG 634, although boats after 83384 apparently did not get said overly complicated hull numbers.

A great shot of CG 83301 with a lifeboat astern. Note the four twin can depth charge racks. The second 83 completed in 1941, she spent four years as a harbor defense boat in NYC before shipping out for the 7th Fleet in June 1945. She was lost at Buckner Bay, Okinawa 9 October 1945 to a typhoon

Aboard an 83 in 1942 during a coastal convoy, photo by William Vandivert from the archives of Life Magazine. Note the riveted bronze wheelhouse and searchlights

This example has an M1917 water-cooled Browning forward. William Vandivert/LIFE

And two Lewis guns on the bridge wings. Note the smooth lines of the bronze superstructure. William Vandivert/LIFE

Note the older ratings and the loaded Lewis magazine. William Vandivert/LIFE

Note the two can gravity depth charge racks port and starboard. Two more racks were over the stern. William Vandivert/LIFE

Stern racks. William Vandivert/LIFE

Arming Mark VI depth charges. William Vandivert/LIFE

Note the Chief and the Navy blimp. William Vandivert/LIFE

CGC 624 in pristine early war condition. Note the 20mm/80 on her quarterdeck and the depth charge racks off her stern. This craft would later become one of the Matchbox Fleet as USCG 14 and would go on to serve post-war as WPB-83373. Photo released on 29 October 1942, No. 105197F, by Morris Rosenfeld, New York (USCG photo)

Riding A “Jeep of The Deep”. These two SPAR cadets at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, New London, Connecticut, take a lively interest in their trip aboard a “jeep of the deep”, an 83-foot Coast Guard patrol craft. The two future SPAR officers are Leila Leverett, left, and Helen D. Darland. U.S. Coast Guard Photograph. Of note, over 10,000 women volunteered for the SPARs during WWII, the Coast Guard’s version of the WAVES

“Due to their low silhouette and slight wake, these craft are often mistaken for submarines,” notes the Sept 1943 ONI 56 on the Coast Guard 83 foot cutters as sub busters.

The most significant combat “kills” attributed to the 83s came from a Cuban-manned boat, Caza Submarino 13 (CS-13). One of 10 delivered to the Cubans at Miami, CS-13 splashed U-176, a Type IXC on 15 May 1943 in the Florida Straits north-east of Havana.

CS13, the smallest U-boat killer.

Deployed far and wide, the 83s in USCG service were often the first on the scene to pick up wrecked mariners after a U-boat slipped back under the sea, especially during 1942’s Operation Drumbeat offensive.

83305– Rescued 11 from the freighter City of New York.
83309– Pulled nine survivors of the schooner Cheerio from the water.
83310– Rescued 25 from the tanker C.O Stillman and another 50 from the tanker William Rockefeller.
83322– Rescued 14 from the freighter Santore.

In the lead-up to Overlord/Neptune, a group of 60 83s along with 840 Coasties were assembled on the eastern coast of England, under the suggestion of FDR himself. Dubbed Rescue Flotilla One under the command of LCDR Alexander V. Stewart, Jr., they would accompany the waves of LCIs and other landing craft into the beaches and, using their 5-foot draft, close in with sinking vessels to recover survivors and floaters.

To keep things easy, the craft were renumbered USCG 1 through USCG 60 and given a large white star on their wheelhouse for aerial recognition.

They landed most of their armament and trained in triage and lifesaving– ready to lower rescue swimmers over the side with a rope if need be.

A superb reference for the “Matchbox Fleet” at Normandy is the 1946 Coast Guard at War: The Landings in France which covers the operation of the flotilla across some 30 pages. Drawn from that is this page on the prep on these “Sea Going Saint Bernards”:

US Coast Guard Cutter 16 at Poole, England in 1944. Notice USCG 10 to the left. CG 16, under LT (j.g.) R.V. McPhail, achieved the Flotilla’s rescue record, picking up 126 survivors and one cadaver on D-Day from three landing craft stricken within a half-mile of the beach, all handled in less than six hours. UA 555.03

Two U.S. Coast Guard 83-foot patrol boats operating off the Normandy beaches as rescue craft, in June 1944. They are USCG-20 (83401) and USCG-21 (83402). 26-G-3743

As noted by the Coast Guard Historian’s Office:

They earned the nickname “Matchbox Fleet” due to their wooden hulls and two Sterling-Viking gasoline engines — one incendiary shell hitting a cutter could easily turn it into a “fireball.”

They were assigned to each of the invasion areas, with 30 serving off the British and Canadian sectors and 30 serving off the American sectors. During Operation Neptune/Overlord these cutters and their crews carried out the Coast Guard’s time-honored task of saving lives, albeit under enemy fire on a shoreline thousands of miles from home. The cutters of Rescue Flotilla One saved more than 400 men on D-Day alone and by the time the unit was decommissioned in December 1944, they had saved 1,438 souls.

“Normandy Landings, June 1944. Coast Guard Invasion Rescue Flotilla Men on Alert. They wear the Death’s-Head emblem of skull and crossbones on their helmets, these Coast Guard invasion veterans, but theirs is an errand of mercy. Here, members of an 83-foot Coast Guard rescue cutter, part of the famous flotilla which rescued hundreds of men from the cold channel waters off France, keep alert while on patrol.” 26-G-2388

The 83-foot Coast Guard cutter USCG 1 (83300) off Omaha Beach on the morning of 6 June 1944, tied up to an LCT and the Samuel Chase. Escorting the first waves into Omaha her crew pulled 28 survivors from a sunken landing craft before 0700 on D-Day.

Do not get it confused, the Coasties weren’t just there as sort of a seagoing ambulance service, untargeted by enemy bullets. They took fire of all sorts all day. McPhail’s CG 16 for instance “nosed in among the struggling groups of men floundering in diesel oil and debris. Although shells were splashing around it and mines were detonating, the cutter’s crew calmly went about the rescue work. With 90 casualties as its first load, the cutter sped to the Coast Guard transport Dickman.”

“Normandy Invasion, June 1944. Coast Guard Rescue Craft Shelled by Nazis. Twin spouts boil close off the stern of a U.S. Coast Guard invasion rescue craft in the English Channel as Nazi shore batteries pour shellfire into the mighty Allied liberation fleet.” 26-G-2374

The boats of the Matchbox Fleet remained offshore for days, dodging gunfire from marauding E-boat raids, magnesium flares dropped by German planes at night, and bumping up against parachute mines.

“Normandy Invasion, June 1944. Towed back from Death. Torn by German shells, the landing barge was sinking. American soldiers aboard appeared lost as the little craft settled in the English Channel waters. Along came a Coast Guard Rescue Cutter poking boldly into the shoal waters. A line was cast and made fast.” 26-G-06-24-44(2)

“Sub Busters in Invasion Role. The U.S. Coast Guard’s famous 83 footers, sub-busters in the Battle of the Atlantic, and to their laurels as rescue craft in the D-Day sweep across the English Channel to the French Coast. These swift, little, intrepid craft are the Coast Guard boats that have been mentioned over and over again in radio and news dispatches for their gallant rescue role during the initial smash on France.”

Coast Guard 83-foot rescue boat CGC-16 unloading wounded troops off Normandy France June 6, 1944, to USS Joseph T. Dickman APA-13 0930 hrs morning of D-Day LIFE Archives Ralph Morse Photographer

Casualties are transferred from a U.S. Coast Guard 83-foot rescue boat to a larger ship, for evacuation from the combat zone, June 1944. Note the name Miss Fury on the boat’s superstructure as well as the large white star for aircraft recognition and the radar on the mast. 26-G-2346

USCG 20 was driven ashore in Normandy during the storm that destroyed the artificial Mulberry harbors in June 1944. She was later repaired and transferred to the Royal Navy.

There were many other USCG-manned and operated craft off Normandy for Overlord/Neptune.

Many also performed yeoman service that day.

“The Coast Guard-manned landing craft LCI(L)-85 approached the beach at 12 knots. Her crew winced as they heard repeated thuds against the vessel’s hull made by the wooden stakes covering the beach like a crazy, tilted, man-made forest… The Coast Guard LCI(L)-85, battered by enemy fire after approaching Omaha Beach, prepares to evacuate the troops she was transporting to an awaiting transport. The 󈭅” sank shortly after this photograph was taken. The LCI(L)-85 was one of four Coast Guard LCI’s that were destroyed on D-Day.”

Post-Overlord

In the days immediately after the landings, six 83 footers of the Matchbox Flotilla were detailed to operate a rush cross-channel courier service, making four crossings a day carrying mail and urgent Army dispatches to France every six hours. While the Army had originally planned to use planes for the task, it was found that the boats could get there more reliably, even if they had to maneuver around floating mines and unmarked wrecks in the process.

U.S. Navy motor torpedo boats (PT) and U.S. Coast Guard 83-foot patrol boats use the waterfront as a temporary base while operating out of Cherbourg, 30 August 1944. CG 5, with her depth charge racks refitted, is closest to the camera. The PT boat at left is PT-199, a 78-foot Higgins that famously carried ADM Harold R. Stark to Allied invasion beachhead at Normandy. Note the depth charges on the sterns of the USCG patrol boats in the foreground. 80-G-256074

The Pacific

Meanwhile, the 83s were involved in the push towards Tokyo as well. In January 1945, 30 boats were formed into USCG PTC Flotilla One and sent to Manicani Island in the Leyte Gulf, where the U.S. was busy rooting out Japanese holdouts in the quest to liberate the Philippines. Some eight miles west of Guiuan, Manicani would become a major destroyer repair base and a ship repair unit. Another 24 boats were dispatched late in the war to operate with the 7th Fleet at Okinawa, Saipan, Guam, Eniwetok, and elsewhere to serve as harbor defense vessels, on guard against Japanese suicide attacks and frogmen.

Speaking of which, one such vessel, USCGC 83525, was dispatched with Navy RADM M.R. Greer (COMMFLTAIRWING 18) from Tinian to remote Aguijan Island in the Northern Marianas on 4 September 1945 to accept the surrender of the tiny garrison from 2nd LT Kinichi Yamada of the Imperial Army. The Coastie was sent as a larger vessel could not negotiate the shallows of the island.

When Yamada climbed aboard from a landing craft, his greenish pallor matched the color of his faded uniform. He looked even smaller than he had at our first meeting, encumbered as he was with an outsized dispatch case. The confined deck space on the slender vessel posed a problem: where to place the surrender documents for the signing. Finally, the skipper of the Coast Guard boat suggested using the cover of a ventilator just behind the wheelhouse, and that was where the parties arrayed themselves, the Americans on one side and the three Japanese on the other. Nobody invited me to be part of the U.S. contingent, so I positioned myself directly behind Yamada.

Further, the 83s were influential to the war effort in a quiet way, as they were a big feature on period recruiting posters for the Coast Guard. Of course, less than 3,000 of the service’s 170,000 men at its wartime peak were assigned to these hardy boats at any given time, but you got to get the kids off the farm somehow.

Their wartime service was largely forgotten, the 83s earned no battlestars and unit citations. Those sent overseas were largely left there, either to rot or to be transferred to overseas allies. Several were lost during the war: 83301 and 83306 to a 1945 typhoon in Okinawa 83415/CG 27 and 83471/CG 47 sank in a storm off Normandy two weeks after D-Day, their hulls were torn open on submerged wreckage, and 83421 was lost due to a midnight collision with a subchaser while on a blackout convoy. Others were soon disposed of in the inevitable postwar constriction of funds.

These wooden boats, after several years of hard work, were overloaded, stressed, and could typically by 1945 just plod along at about 12 knots, sustained. By 1946, around 100 remained in Coast Guard custody, with many of those laid up. The Navy picked up a handful for such miscellaneous use as range control boats, yard boats, and torpedo retrievers.

Some were upgraded with Cummings diesel engines and all-white peacetime schemes and continued in Coast Guard service through the 1950s. Notably, their armament in peacetime seems to have solidified with a single 20mm Oerlikon over the stern, four abbreviated two-can depth charge racks clustered around the gun, and two mousetraps forward although the latter feature was not always mounted.

CG 83464 in 1949. Delivered in July 1943 from Wheeler, she served out of Charleston before joining the D-Day fleet as CG 43. She was decommissioned in 1961 and sold.

CG 83499 at Biloxi’s annual blessing of the fleet. Note the canvassed 20mm on her stern under an awning. This boat spent WWII as a training ship at Coast Guard HQ and was disposed of in 1959.

CGC 83499 in Pascagoula, MS circa late 1950s

With the service gaining new and improved patrol boats of the Cape and Point classes, the days of the old 83s were fading. In the early 1960s, the remaining 44 hulls still holding on were liquidated, with many being disposed of by fire or scuttling post decommissioning. The last on the USCG’s rolls was CG 83506, disposed of by sinking on 22 March 1966.

Vessels in overseas service remained around for a few more years. The type was used by Cuba (12), the Dominican Republic (3). Haiti (1) Venezuela (4), Colombia (2), Peru (6), and Mexico (3).

Notably, four transferred to Turkey in 1953 were noted in Janes as late as 1995, still with their mousetraps.

Some remaining vessels were converted into yachts, or fishing boats, dive charter vessels, or workboats and ultimately faded into history.

Others had more pedestrian fates.

CGC 83499, the old ghost of the Mississippi Sound shown in the two above photos, was ashore as Pandoras steak house in Destin until 2005.

Stripped 83s for sale in the Tacoma area in the 1960s, as-is, how-is, where-is

CG-83527, which served on anti-submarine duties in the Gulf of Mexico in WWII, ended her career in Tacoma, Washington in 1962. She was saved in 2003 and restored slowly and extensively over the course of a decade to roughly her 1950 appearance. Its operators have an extensive website with many resources on the class including a full set of plans.

Another of the class, 83366/D-Day CG 11, was purchased by a Seattle couple in terrible condition for $100 and they are in the process of returning her its 1944 arrangement.

Notably, CG 83366 still has her bronze pilothouse.

Speaking of vets, the 83-Footer Sailor portal, long maintained by Al Readdy, seems to be offline but can still be found via archives. Meanwhile, those interested in Coast Guard patrol boat history, in general, should check out HMC James T. Flynn, Jr., USNR(ret)’s excellent 61-page essay.

Today, the USCG Museum has a panel dedicated to the work of the Matchbox Fleet in their D-Day exhibit.

Specs: (extracted from U.S. Coast Guard Cutters & Crafts of World War II by Robert Scheina)

A wartime 83 by Jack Read

Displacement: 76 tons fully loaded
Length: 83 ft
Beam: 16 ft
Draft: 5 ft. 4″
Main Engines: 83343 through 83348: 2 Hall Scott Defenders, 1.200 rpm all others: 2 Sterling Viking II SHP All units: 1,200
2 Propellers: 34″Dia X 27° Pitch (Pitch varied with mission)
2 Kohler Generators 120/240 VAC 60 cycle
Max Speed 15.2 kts, 215 mi radius (1945) 23.5 statute mi (trials,1946)
Max Sustained 12.0 kts. 375 mi radius (1945)
Cruising 10.0 kts, 475 mi radius (1945)
Economic 8.2 kts, 575 mi radius (1945)
Gasoline (95%) 1,900 gal
Complement 1 officer, 13 men (1945)
Electronics (1945)
Detection Radar SO-2 (most units)
Sonar QBE series (none on 83339. 83367-83369, 83427, 83476-83480)
Armament
1941 1 1-pounder. 2 .30cal mg
1945 1 20mm/80,4 dc racks with 8 Mark VI depth charges. 2 Mousetraps none on 8330
83312, 83335, 83342, 83367, 83387, 83388, 83392, 83427, 83470, 83475. 83491. 83492. 83494,
83501, 83507, 83512, 83515, 83516, 83518-83521, 83529

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Doyen DD- 280 - History

This page provides the hull numbers of all U.S. Navy destroyers numbered in the DD series from 200 through 399, with links to those ships with photos available in the Online Library.

See the list below to locate photographs of individual destroyers.

If the destroyer you want does not have an active link on this page, contact the Photographic Section concerning other research options.

Left Column --
Destroyers numbered
DD-200 through DD-289:

  • DD-200 : unnamed (construction cancelled Feb. 1919)
  • DD-201 : unnamed (construction cancelled Feb. 1919)
  • DD-202 : unnamed (construction cancelled Feb. 1919)
  • DD-203 : unnamed (construction cancelled Feb. 1919)
  • DD-204 : unnamed (construction cancelled Feb. 1919)
  • DD-205 : unnamed (construction cancelled Feb. 1919)
  • DD-206 : Chandler (1919-1946),
    later DMS-9 & AG-108
  • DD-207 : Southard (1919-1946),
    later DMS-10
  • DD-208 : Hovey (1919-1945),
    later DMS-11
  • DD-209 : Long (1919-1945),
    later DMS-12


Seznam voja&scaronkih vsebin podaja članke, ki se v Wikipediji nana&scaronajo na vojsko, oborožene sile, za&scarončito in obrambo.

Unijapedija je koncept, zemljevid ali semantično mrežo, organizirano kot enciklopedije - slovar. To je na kratko opredelitev vsakega koncepta in njegovih odnosov.

To je velikanski spletni mentalni zemljevid, ki služi kot osnova za koncept diagramov. To je prost za uporabo in vsak članek ali dokument, ki se lahko prenese. To je orodje, vir ali predlog za študije, raziskave, izobraževanje, učenje in poučevanje, ki jih učitelji, vzgojitelji, dijaki ali študenti lahko uporablja Za akademskega sveta: za šolo, primarno, sekundarno, gimnazije, srednje tehnične stopnje, šole, univerze, dodiplomski, magistrski ali doktorski stopinj za papir, poročil, projektov, idej, dokumentacije, raziskav, povzetkov, ali teze. Tu je definicija, razlaga, opis ali pomen vsakega pomembno, na kateri želite informacije in seznam njihovih povezanih konceptov kot pojmovnika. Na voljo v Slovenski, Angleščina, Španski, Portugalski, Japonski, Kitajski, Francosko, Nemški, Italijansko, Poljski, Nizozemski, Rusko, Arabsko, Hindi, Švedski, Ukrajinski, Madžarski, Katalonščina, Češka, Hebrejščina, Danski, Finski, Indonezijski, Norveški, Romunščina, Turški, Vietnamščina, Korejščina, Thai, Grški, Bolgarski, Hrvaški, Slovak, Litvanski, Filipino, Latvijski in Estonski Več jezikov kmalu.

Google Play, Android in logotip Googla Play sta blagovni znamki podjetja Google Inc.


Einstein&aposs thought experiment when he was a teenager helped scientists determine his IQ

Jonathan Wai, an assistant professor of education policy and psychology at the University of Arkansas who writes about the study of intelligence for Psychology Today, argues that Einstein might have scored high, given the abilities he demonstrated in his work. Wai points to Einstein’s famous teenage thought experiment, in which he visually imagined chasing after a light beam. That, coupled with scientists’ਏinding in the 1990s that the part of Einstein’s brain that processes three-dimensional visualization was significantly larger than typical, “suggests that Einstein was highly spatially talented,” Wai explains.

Wai also says that Einstein’s choice of scientific specialty, in itself, also indicates that he would have had a high score. “People who obtain PhDs in areas such as physics tend to have extremely high IQs𠉪 combination of mathematical, verbal and spatial reasoning ability,” Wai says. “This has been shown in a stratified random sample of the population as well as within a sample of gifted individuals deliberately selected to be in the top one percent of ability or IQ. What this suggests is that if someone is a physicist, they are very likely to be well above average in IQ relative to the general population.”


Perhaps you have wondered how predictable machines like computers can generate randomness. In reality, most random numbers used in computer programs are pseudo-random, which means they are generated in a predictable fashion using a mathematical formula. This is fine for many purposes, but it may not be random in the way you expect if you're used to dice rolls and lottery drawings.

RANDOM.ORG offers true random numbers to anyone on the Internet. The randomness comes from atmospheric noise, which for many purposes is better than the pseudo-random number algorithms typically used in computer programs. People use RANDOM.ORG for holding drawings, lotteries and sweepstakes, to drive online games, for scientific applications and for art and music. The service has existed since 1998 and was built by Dr Mads Haahr of the School of Computer Science and Statistics at Trinity College, Dublin in Ireland. Today, RANDOM.ORG is operated by Randomness and Integrity Services Ltd.

Games and Lotteries

Lottery Quick Pick is perhaps the Internet's most popular with over 280 lotteries
Keno Quick Pick for the popular game played in many countries
Coin Flipper will give you heads or tails in many currencies
Dice Roller does exactly what it says on the tin
Playing Card Shuffler will draw cards from multiple shuffled decks
Birdie Fund Generator will create birdie holes for golf courses

Random Drawings

Q3.1 in the FAQ explains how to pick a winner for your giveaway for FREE
Third-Party Draw Service is the premier solution to holding random drawings online
Step by Step Guide explains how to hold a drawing with the Third-Party Draw Service
Step by Step Video shows how to hold a drawing with the Third-Party Draw Service
Price Calculator tells exactly how much your drawing will cost
Drawing FAQ answers common questions about holding drawings
Public Records shows all completed drawings going back five years
Drawing Result Widget can be used to publish your winners on your web page
Multi-Round Giveaway Service for verified video giveaways

Numbers

Integer Generator makes random numbers in configurable intervals
Sequence Generator will randomize an integer sequence of your choice
Integer Set Generator makes sets of non-repeating integers
Gaussian Generator makes random numbers to fit a normal distribution
Decimal Fraction Generator makes numbers in the [0,1] range with configurable decimal places
Raw Random Bytes are useful for many cryptographic purposes

Lists and Strings and Maps, Oh My!

List Randomizer will randomize a list of anything you have (names, phone numbers, etc.)
String Generator makes random alphanumeric strings
Password Generator makes secure passwords for your Wi-Fi or that extra Gmail account
Clock Time Generator will pick random times of the day
Calendar Date Generator will pick random days across nearly three and a half millennia
Geographic Coordinate Generator will pick a random spot on our planet's surface
Bitmaps in black and white
Hexadecimal Color Code Generator will pick color codes, for example for use as web colors
Pregenerated Files contain large amounts of downloadable random bits
Pure White Audio Noise for composition or just to test your audio equipment
Jazz Scales to practice improvisation for students of jazz guitar
Samuel Beckett's randomly generated short prose
DNA Protein Sequence Randomizer (at Bio-Web)

Web Tools and Widgets for Your Pages

Integer Widget Wizard will put a mini-RANDOM.ORG on your web page or blog
Draw Widget Wizard will put the result of a paid drawing on your web page or blog
HTTP API to get true random numbers into your own code
Guidelines describe how to avoid getting in trouble
Banned Hosts lists who didn't behave and have been blocked

Learn about Randomness

Introduction to Randomness explains what true random numbers are and why they're interesting
History explains how RANDOM.ORG started and where it is today
Many Testimonials from folks who have found very creative uses for random numbers
Acknowledgements to all the generous folks who have helped out
Quotations about randomness in science, the arts and in life generally
Media Coverage and Scientific Citations lists popular print and scientific mention of the service
News about the latest additions to the site

Statistics

Real-Time Statistics show how the generator is performing right now
Statistical Analysis explains how you test random numbers for randomness
Bit Tally shows how much randomness has been generated since 1998 (hint: lots!)
Your Quota tells how many random bits you have left for today

Contact and Help

FAQ contains answers to frequently asked questions
Newsletter appears at random intervals, but do sign up
Contact Details in case you want to get in touch


Battle of Thermopylae

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Battle of Thermopylae, (480 bce ), battle in central Greece at the mountain pass of Thermopylae during the Persian Wars. The Greek forces, mostly Spartan, were led by Leonidas. After three days of holding their own against the Persian king Xerxes I and his vast southward-advancing army, the Greeks were betrayed, and the Persians were able to outflank them. Sending the main army in retreat, Leonidas and a small contingent remained behind to resist the advance and were defeated.

The Battle of Thermopylae’s political origins can be traced back to Xerxes’ predecessor, Darius I (the Great), who sent heralds to Greek cities in 491 bce in the hopes of persuading them to accept Persian authority. This offended the proud Greeks greatly the Athenians went so far as to toss the Persian heralds into a pit, while the Spartans followed suit and tossed them into a well. In 480 bce Xerxes invaded Greece as a continuation of Darius’s original plan. He began the same way his predecessor had: he sent heralds to Greek cities—but he skipped over Athens and Sparta because of their previous responses. Many Greek city-states either joined Xerxes or remained neutral, while Athens and Sparta led the resistance with a number of other city-states behind them. Before invading, Xerxes implored the Spartan king Leonidas to surrender his arms. Leonidas famously replied, “Come and take them” (“Molon labe”). Xerxes intended to do just that and thus moved toward Thermopylae.

Xerxes led a vast army overland from the Dardanelles, accompanied by a substantial fleet moving along the coast. His forces quickly seized northern Greece and began moving south. The Greek resistance tried to halt Persian progress on land at the narrow pass of Thermopylae and at sea nearby in the straits of Artemisium. The Greek army was led by Leonidas, who was estimated to have had around 7,000 men. Xerxes, on the other hand, had anywhere from 70,000 to 300,000. Despite the disparity in numbers, the Greeks were able to maintain their position. Their strategy involved holding a line only a few dozen yards long between a steep hillside and the sea. This constricted the battlefield and prevented the Persians from utilizing their vast numbers. For two days the Greeks defended against Persian attacks and suffered light losses as they imposed heavy casualties on the Persian army. Only when the Greeks were betrayed did the battle take a detrimental turn for them. Ephialtes, a Greek citizen desiring reward, informed Xerxes of a path that went around Thermopylae, thus rendering the Greeks’ line useless in preventing forward advancement of the Persian army.

Xerxes took advantage of this betrayal and sent part of his army along this path, led by Ephialtes himself. After reaching the other side, the Persians attacked and destroyed a portion of the Greek army. This forced Leonidas to call a war council, at which it was decided that retreating was the best option. However, as the majority of the Greek army retreated, Leonidas, his 300 bodyguards, some helots (people enslaved by the Spartans), and 1,100 Boeotians remained behind, supposedly because retreating would defy Spartan law and custom. They held their ground against the Persians but were quickly defeated by the vast enemy army, and many (if not all sources differ) were killed, including Leonidas. News of this defeat reached the troops at Artemisium, and Greek forces there retreated as well. The Persian victory at Thermopylae allowed for Xerxes’ passage into southern Greece, which expanded the Persian empire even further.

Today the Battle of Thermopylae is celebrated as an example of heroic persistence against seemingly impossible odds. Soon after the battle, the Greeks built a stone lion in honour of those who had died and specifically for the fallen king Leonidas. In 1955 a statue of Leonidas was erected by King Paul of Greece in commemoration of his and his troops’ bravery. The Battle of Thermopylae also served as the inspiration for the film 300 (2006).


Watch the video: #Clashful history