26 September 1939

26 September 1939


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26 September 1939

Poland

Germans intensify their attack on Warsaw

War in the Air

Twenty German aircraft attempt to attack the British Home Fleet in the North Sea without success.

War at Sea

Churchill gives an overly optimistic view of the campaign against the U-boats



Historical Events in 1939 (Part 2)

Event of Interest

Aug 6 1st broadcast of "Dinah Shore Show" on NBC-radio

Event of Interest

Aug 7 Millionaire Howard Hughes is presented with a Congressional Gold Medal

Event of Interest

Aug 8 7th Venice Film Festival opens with a United States boycott due to Benito Mussolini's Fascist Italian regime

    2nd Dutch De Geer government forms (1st with Social Democrats) Sergei Rachmaninov's last appearance in Europe Yankees set AL shutout margin with 21-0 victory over A's Sabotage suspected in crash of 'City of San Francisco' First night MLB game in the City of Chicago is played at Comiskey Park White Sox beat St. Louis Browns, 5-2

The Wizard of Oz

Aug 15 "The Wizard of Oz", American musical fantasy film directed by Victor Fleming and King Vidor, premieres at Grauman's Chinese Theatre, Hollywood, starring Judy Garland (Dorothy), Ray Bolger (Scarecrow), Jack Haley (Tin Man), Bert Lahr (Cowardly Lion), Frank Morgan (Wizard), Billie Burke (Glinda), and Margaret Hamilton (Wicked Witch)

    "The Wizard of Oz" opens at Loews Capitol Theatre in NY 37.6 cm rainfall at Tuckerton, NJ (state record) 1st black bowling league formed (National Bowling Assoc) Russian offensive under General Zjoekov against Japanese invasion in Mongolia Dutch border guards take positions for German invasion Premier De Geer recalls Dutch holidaymakers in Black Forest John Cobb (Britain) drives 365.85 MPH (593.48 KPH) at Bonneville Flats

Treaty of Interest

Aug 23 Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union agree the Molotov-Ribbentrop non-aggression pact and secretly divide Poland between themselves, setting the stage for World War II

    Germany & USSR sign 10-year non-aggression pact 1st major league baseball telecast on W2XBS- Cincinnati Reds defeat the Brooklyn Dodgers at Ebbets Field, Brooklyn Belgium mobilizes Croatia gets autonomous status Erich Warsitz in a Heinkel He-178 makes the 1st manned jet-propelled flight Nazi Germany demands Danzig & Polish corridor

Event of Interest

Aug 27 Queen Wilhelmina of the Netherlands receives German ambassador Grave Zech


Behind the Lines

From Socialist Appeal, Vol. III No. 73, 26 September 1939, p.ف.
Transcribed & marked up by Einde O’Callaghan for ETOL.

The Far Eastern front is now a definitely active sector of the second world war. Coming developments there will proceed in closest relation to events on the fronts of Europe.

From its seeming isolation after the signature of the Nazi-Soviet pact, Japan has returned to partial and tentative collaboration with the newly-extended axis. Japanese fears that the pact meant that Russia would be free to deal with a single-handed enemy in the Far East have been entirely dispelled. Russia has instead arranged a truce quite satisfactory to Japan and has become directly involved in the war in Europe.

Consequently Stalin’s “peace policy” has in quick succession given the go-ahead signals for war in Poland and renewed war in China. The Japanese have naturally taken up the cue. They have announced the opening of a new drive in West China and have resumed needling Britain and France. Most significantly of all, the Japanese army-inspired press has begun to assume a truculent tone toward the United States, in sharp contrast to the previous effort to smear milk and honey on the profoundly antagonistic relations between the two countries.

There are several straws in the wind to attest to further coming changes in the set-up. Gen. Juichi Terauchi, a former Japanese war minister, was on his way to Germany on a special mission generally assumed to be strengthening of Japanese contact with the axis. When the Stalin-Hitler pact was signed Terauchi’s mission was cancelled and he arrived in Italy as a plain tourist who announced he would not go to Germany. But Terauchi has now gone on to Berlin, to meet German leaders.

Some equally significant journeying is being done by Chow En-lai, one of Stalin’s principal acolytes in China. Chow left Chungking for Moscow last week on an unannounced mission. Is Chow going to be informed that the thin trickle of Soviet aid to China will now cease? Is he going to receive new orders for the Eighth Route Army which will in effect retire it from effective struggle against the Japanese invasion? Will the Chinese Communist Party – already half-strangled by the tortuous twists in its policy – be ordered to throw its support to the “peace party” in Chungking?

All of these are now strong possibilities, even though the transition to such moves is likely to go through a careful period of tentative reconnoitering. For the Soviet-Japanese truce is just as tentative as the Stalin-Hitler bargain.

In any case, the developments generally have created new and serious difficulties for the Chinese national cause. The road to Burma is still open and so is the road to French Indo-China, but there is little chance that French and British arms and supplies will be flowing over them in any significant quantities.

The situation leaves the problem primarily in the hands of the Roosevelt War Deal. For American imperialism the main issues of the war still remain in the Pacific, cradle of the great expansionist dreams of tomorrow. Wall Street has a definite stake in the destruction of German imperialism and in the weakening of Anglo-French imperialism. But its ultimate war aims are also premised upon the establishment of undisputed American domination of the Pacific. These aims will bring it into collision with Japan and possibly even with Russia if Russia remains part of the axis.


In the Labor Unions

From Socialist Appeal, Vol. III No. 73, 26 September 1939, p.ق.
Transcribed & marked up by Einde O’ Callaghan for the Encyclopaedia of Trotskyism On-Line (ETOL).

Here is a choice bit of information that Attorney General (I Break Strikes) Frank Murphy let slip a few days ago in Washington.

“Detective organizations set up by industrial concerns to prevent sabotage would work closely with the Federal Bureau of Investigation” Mr. Murphy explained to a New York Times reporter.
 

Employ Spies

What does it mean? The federal government is enlisting the services of stool-pigeons, company spies, strike-breaking organizations, to fight “sabotage.”

And what is “sabotage” to a Pinkerton? Or a Tom Girdler agent? Or any stool pigeon in a union? Workers have had not a little experience with this in the last few years. “Sabotage” consists of being a good union man, fighting for rights and good conditions within the plant.

The federal government can’t just jail every good union man who feels that, war or no war, workers have a right to fight for just demands. That would be too crude. It would expose the war dictatorship too much.
 

Frameups Ahead

So the government must now prepare the ground work for a frameup. “Sabotage by spies” becomes the theme song of the FBI. Once that is accepted, any worker in the plant who remains a union militant is branded a “saboteur.” He “disrupts” national defense. Company stool pigeons will hurl the charge. The FBI is going to “work closely with them.”

Yet the United Rubber Workers of America’s convention, to mention the latest union convention held, went on record to support the Roosevelt administration in its war moves!
 

Seniority Rights!

Our prediction of last May that the question of seniority rights during war-time would become a greater issue apparently is being borne out by various information coming to the office.

Unions everywhere are beginning to ask for the continuation of seniority rights during war service. That is, if a workers is taken from the plant for army service, his seniority continues as though he remained in the plant.

What is our attitude towards this demand? We can only reiterate what was published then. Now every unionist is in favor of seniority rights under all circumstances. What is disturbing is the calm acceptance of the idea of conscription in wartime.

Workers should never give up an inch of their rights under any conditions, if it is possible. Fight for seniority rights in event of conscription? Sure. The best way to fight against it, however, is to fight against the conscription of labor.

While on this subject, it might be worthwhile to repeat certain other elementary strategy for unionists in this period.

War does not substitute new problems for old ones in the union movement. It adds new ones and intensifies the present problems. The rising price level makes the wage question more acute. The government demands for war production will intensify the struggle over hours of work, conditions of work and the speed-up.
 

What to Do

Every present headache of a shop committeeman increases. Before actual declaration of war, the bosses will give in to serious pressure because the prospect of additional profits is too tempting to permit big shutdowns.

However, the bosses hope to end all the business of making any concessions once war starts by the use of the federal machinery to hogtie labor.

The “impartial” labor boards consisting mainly of professional and business people are supposed to settle all labor disputes, backed by the US Army. What’s new for the labor movement is how to fight these boards. Direct negotiations between unions and employers is the general slogan around which this struggle can be carried.

The aim of progressive unionists is always the same. Get the best possible union conditions under any circumstances.


Blitzkrieg Tactics: Lightning Conquest of Poland

On the 1 st of September 1939, Germany launched one of the most dramatic military campaigns of the 20 th century. Troops poured across the border into Poland, smashing the defenders. In doing so, they seemed to prove the power of a new form of aggressive tactics, the blitzkrieg.

The Blitzkrieg Principle

Blitzkrieg tactics were the natural continuation of German doctrine from the late First World War and of a broader school of inter war military thinking. During the final year of the First World War, the Germans had broken the stalemate on the Western Front. This was achieved by creating hard hitting, fast moving formations of elite stormtroopers.

German Soldier Marching in Parade – 1939.

They broke into the Allied trench lines through a combination of superior equipment and elite soldiers. Rather than consolidate the gains they made, they kept moving, maintaining the momentum and leaving others to capitalize upon their success. This kept the offense moving and prevented the enemy from regrouping, leading to huge gains.

Wehrmacht Soldiers with mortar and MG 34 Machine Gun.

Between the wars, several military thinkers in both Britain and Germany explored the potential provided by tanks. Men like B. H. Liddell Hart and Heinz Guderian believed that tanks leading armored assaults could smash holes in enemy lines, leaving other forces to follow through. Here again, there seemed to be an opportunity for a hard hitting, fast moving approach to the fight.

The result was the German blitzkrieg doctrine.

Heinz Guderian.Photo: Bundesarchiv, Bild 101I-139-1112-17 Knobloch, Ludwig CC-BY-SA 3.0

Vulnerable Poland

German armed forces were carefully cultivated to prepare them for this form of warfare. Under Hitler, Germany invested heavily in tanks and mechanized infantry as well as the artillery and ground attack aircraft that would soften the enemy up before a breakthrough.

But the success of the blitzkrieg in Poland was as much a result of Polish vulnerability as it was of German strength.

Hitler watching German soldiers marching into Poland in September 1939.Photo: Bundesarchiv, Bild 183-S55480 / CC-BY-SA 3.0

Western Poland included a lot of wide, flat land, ideal for a fast advance. Coming at the end of the summer, the invasion occurred while the ground was hard and dry, adding to the ease with which the German troops advanced.

The Polish armed forces, though hardy and courageous, were badly suited to facing these new German tactics.

The Polish army was predominantly made up of slow moving infantry, unable to respond to the swift strikes of the Germans. Their equipment was less modern than that of the well funded and technologically innovative Germans. Of the faster moving Polish units, many were cavalry rather than tanks, and so extremely vulnerable to modern weapons.

Polish soldiers with anti-aircraft artillery near the Warsaw Central Station in the first days of September 1939.

In the skies, the Poles were equally outmatched. Their best fighters were P.Z.L. P.11s, which had a top speed of 240mph, compared with the 350mph of the German Messerschmitt Bf109E. 842 Polish planes faced 4,700 German aircraft. The structure of the Polish armed forces meant that fighter cover was poorly coordinated so that the resources they had weren’t well deployed.

Luftwaffe soldiers of the Jagdgeschwader 53 (JG 53) fighter wing (also known as “Ace of Spades”) resting at an airfield infront of a Messerschmitt Bf 109 with an open bonnet. 1939.Photo: Bundesarchiv, Bild 101I-337-0036-02A / Folkerts / CC-BY-SA 3.0

The War Begins

At 0445 on the 1 st of September, the invasion began.

It was a textbook execution of Blitzkrieg. For the first hour, Luftwaffe bombers and fighters hit Polish positions, taking out air defenses, troop concentrations, and transport networks. An hour later, they were followed by the ground advance. While other troops held the line, armored formations punched through the weakened Polish forces. Infantry and mobile artillery followed up behind them.

Ju 87 Bs over Poland, Sep 1939.Photo Bundesarchiv, Bild 183-1987-1210-502 Hoffmann, Heinrich CC-BY-SA 3.0

The speed of these advances allowed the columns to achieve their strategic objectives. Entire formations of the Polish army were isolated and then surrounded. Cut off from each other, from support, and even from commanders, they struggled to organize a fight back. Meanwhile, the Germans were in their rear, smashing supply lines, seizing cities and transport networks.

Within days, the Germans were fifty miles through the Polish lines, then a hundred miles. The speed and ferocity of Blitzkrieg were paying off.

The city of Wieluń destroyed by Luftwaffe bombing.1 Sep 1939

It’s said that in war no plan survives contact with the enemy, and so the Germans were almost as surprised as the Poles to find that their plan remained intact. They didn’t even know how many of the Poles they had managed to cut off because the dust raised by those forces was blocking the view for aerial reconnaissance.

Proof of the Principle?

On the 9 th of September, the Poles launched a counterattack at the Bzura river, hoping to make the most of German activity in the center. But the German Army Group South moved to counter this, channeling the Poles into a battle on a narrow front in which they were once again encircled.

Meanwhile, Guderian’s column was pushing hard into the east. Their capture of almost all of Brest Litovsk by the 14 th of September left the Germans securely placed in the Polish rear. Even before the Russians invaded eastern Poland on the 17 th , the outcome of the war was clear.

Battle of the Bzura- Polish cavalry in Sochaczew in 1939.

As tens of thousands of Polish servicemen fled across the border, determined to keep up the fight from abroad, the world began acknowledging the power of blitzkrieg.

Did the invasion of Poland really prove that blitzkrieg tactics were so very powerful? The Polish army was out of date compared with German fighting forces. As the rest of the war would prove, dominance in the skies was a huge part in winning a modern war. Even with other tactics, the Germans would almost certainly have won.

Wielkopolska Brygada Kawalerii, Battle of Bzura, central Poland, 1939.

Blitzkrieg triumphed again in France the following year, seeming to set the seal on its supremacy. But later efforts were less effective. When countered with modern tanks and an effective defensive line, German armored attacks could be repeatedly stopped. The Germans themselves would prove the power of defensive tactics in Normandy before launching a failed blitzkrieg style offensive in the Battle of the Bulge.

German troops advancing.

The invasion of Poland showed that, in the right circumstances, these tank tactics could work. But it also created an exaggerated image of their effectiveness, one that shaped the way the war was fought and that has colored depictions of the Second World War ever since.


Franklin Roosevelt appeals to Hitler for peace

On September 27, 1938, President Franklin Roosevelt writes to German Chancellor Adolf Hitler regarding the threat of war in Europe. The German chancellor had been threatening to invade the Sudetenland of Czechoslovakia and, in the letter, his second to Hitler in as many days, Roosevelt reiterated the need to find a peaceful resolution to the issue.

The previous day, FDR had written to Hitler with an appeal to negotiate with Czechoslovakia regarding Germany’s desire for the natural and industrial resources of the Sudetenland rather than resort to force. Hitler responded that Germany was entitled to the area because of the “shameful” way in which the Treaty of Versailles, which had ended World War I, had made Germany a “pariah” in the community of nations. The treaty had given the Sudetenland, a territory that was believed by Hitler and many of his supporters to be inherently German, to the state of Czechoslovakia. Therefore, Hitler reasoned, German invasion of the Sudetenland was justified, as annexation by Germany would simply mean returning the area to its cultural and historical roots. Hitler assured Roosevelt that he also desired to avoid another large-scale war in Europe.


The Orange Leader (Orange, Tex.), Vol. 26, No. [208], Ed. 1 Friday, September 1, 1939

Daily newspaper from Orange, Texas that includes local, state and national news along with extensive advertising.

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Born This Day In History 26th September

Celebrating Birthdays Today
Winnie Mandela
Born: 26th September 1936 Bizana, South Africa
Known For : Ex-Wife of Nelson Mandela of South Africa and a member of the ANC's National Executive Committee. She was a leading member of the anti apartheid movement during the white minority ruling government before and while her husband was in prison. Due to some of her speeches where she endorsed the practice of necklacing in the struggle to end apartheid, there are mixed emotions in both South Africa and worldwide.

Olivia Newton-John
Born: 26th September 1948 Cambridge, England
Known For : She is an accomplished singer with a number of hits including "You're The One That I Want" a duo with John Travolta, from her role as Sandy in the movie Grease alongside John Travolta (Danny Zuko), Stockard Channing, Jeff Conaway, and Eve Arden.


Hitler and Mussolini

Nazi Germany’s obvious political and military ally in Europe was Italy. The Italians had been governed by a fascist regime under Benito Mussolini since 1925. Italian fascism was very much the elder brother of Nazism, a fact Hitler himself acknowledged. Yet for all their ideological similarities, the relationship between Hitler and Mussolini was bumpy and complex. The alignment of their two countries was consequently not as firm as many anticipated. By the late 1930s, Germany and Italy had become military allies. Their priorities, however, lay with their own national interests, rather than supporting the interests or ambitions of another country. The union between Nazi Germany and fascist Italy became a marriage of convenience and expedience rather than a firm alliance of sister states.

In his early years at the helm of the NSDAP, Hitler was a great admirer of Mussolini. The Nazi leader was particularly fascinated with Mussolini’s ‘march on Rome’ – a 1922 protest where thousands of fascists and fascist supporters strode into the Italian capital, which led to Mussolini’s appointment as prime minister. In 1923 Hitler wrote to his Italian counterpart about the ‘march on Rome’ the Munich putsch was Hitler’s attempt at replicating it. From the late 1920s, Mussolini provided some financial support to the rising Nazi Party he also allowed SA and SS men to train with his own paramilitary brigade, the Blackshirts. Hitler’s ascension to power in 1933 was publicly praised by Mussolini, who hailed it as a victory for his own fascist ideology.

In private, however, Mussolini was scornful of Hitler and his party. The Italian leader described Mein Kampf as “boring” and thought Hitler’s ideas and theories were “coarse” and “simplistic”. Mussolini, who was prone to egomania, also had a low opinion of Hitler’s elevation to power, which he thought less glorious than his own. The first meeting between the two, held in Venice in June 1934, was disastrous. Mussolini spoke some German and refused to use a translator – but he had great difficulty understanding Hitler’s rough Austrian accent. The Italian was subjected to some of Hitler’s long monologues, which bored him greatly. Both men emerged from the Venice summit thinking much less of each other. Despite this, Nazi and Italian fascist propaganda of the 1930s suggested a close working relationship and even a friendship between the two leaders.

Another important point of difference between the two was their racial views. Mussolini, like Hitler, considered white Europeans to be the architects of civilisation and culture – but his views on race did not extend to hateful anti-Semitism or eugenics. Mussolini was an Italian nationalist who often harked back to the glory and triumphs of ancient Rome. He was therefore scornful of Hitler’s rants about Aryan supremacy. In one speech, the Italian leader expressed “pity” for the racial views being expressed by the Nazis, “the descendants of those who were illiterate when Rome had Caesar, Virgil and Augustus.”

Despite their personal differences, Hitler and Mussolini did manage a degree of co-operation. Germany offered support to Rome during and after the Abyssinian crisis of the mid-1930s. Mussolini had grandiose visions of building a new Italian empire, to replicate the glories of ancient Rome. His first target was Abyssinia (modern-day Ethiopia), one of the few African kingdoms not yet under European control. In October 1935 Italian troops invaded and occupied much of Abyssinia. Italy was strongly criticised in the League of Nations, however, Hitler – who had pulled Germany out of the League in 1933 – backed Mussolini’s action. German-Italian relations were later boosted by their joint involvement in the Spanish Civil War in 1936.

In September 1937 Mussolini paid a state visit to Germany, where he was met with a long parade of troops, artillery and military equipment. These shows of strength were obviously convened to impress the Italian leader, and it worked. Two months after, Italy joined Germany and Japan in the Anti-Comintern Pact: an agreement to resist the expansion of the Soviet Union and prevent the spread of communism. Hitler’s influence on Mussolini became evident in the Italian leader’s Manifesto of Race (July 1938). This decree, which proved very unpopular in Italy, stripped Italian Jews of their citizenship and removed them from government occupations. In September 1938 Mussolini was part of the four-nation summit on the Czechoslovakian crisis and a signatory of the Munich Agreement.

In May 1939 the Nazi-fascist alliance was extended further, with the signing of the Pact of Friendship and Alliance between Germany and Italy. Informally called the ‘Pact of Steel’, this ten-year agreement committed Rome and Berlin to supplying military and economic aid if either nation found itself at war. The pact also contained secret discussions and protocols where Germany and Italy agreed to prepare for a future European war. Negotiators promised a rapid increase in German-Italian trade and military co-operation, while both nations secretly agreed to avoid waging war without the other until 1943.

Hitler ignored this commitment when he ordered German troops to invade Poland in September 1939. Mussolini had received advice that Italy would not be ready for war until late 1942, because of slow industrial growth and military production. The Italian leader heeded this counsel, holding off on declaring war until June 1940, by which time the German conquest of western Europe was almost complete. Mussolini’s main war aim was to seize control of British and French colonies in northern Africa. The campaign was disastrous: by late 1941 most Italian troops in Africa had been defeated. The Allies invaded Italy in July 1943 Mussolini was soon expelled from power and the new government surrendered to the Allies in September. The former fascist dictator was captured by partisans and executed in April 1945, two days before Hitler suicided in Berlin. The body of Il Duce – once the ‘saviour of Italy’ – was suspended on meat hooks and pelted with stones.

A historian’s view:
“Their relationship evolved gradually over the years they had known each other. At first, Hitler deferred to the Duce and appeared to have genuine admiration for the more senior dictator. Later, and especially after Mussolini began to play second fiddle to Hitler as a war leader, summit meetings between the two men had consisted mainly of long monologues by Hitler, with Mussolini barely able to get in a word. At one memorable meeting in 1942, Hitler talked for an hour and forty minutes while General Jodl dozed off and Mussolini kept looking at his watch.”
Ray Moseley

1. Benito Mussolini was the fascist leader of Italy, appointed as prime minister after his ‘march on Rome’ in 1922.

2. Italian fascism was a right-wing nationalist ideology that many, including Hitler, considered the ‘big brother’ of Nazism.

3. Mussolini, however, had a low regard for Hitler and Nazism, believing them to be uncultured and simplistic.

4. Despite this, the two developed a cautious alliance, meeting several times and signing the Pact of Steel in 1939.

5. When Hitler invaded Poland in September 1939, years ahead of schedule, Mussolini refused to support his ally, claiming that Italian industry and military production was not yet ready.


Executive Orders Disposition Tables

Executive Order 8044
Postponing the Effective Date of Executive Order No. 7916 of June 24, 1938, With Respect to Certain Positions and Providing for a Committee To Investigate and Report Methods for Selecting and Promoting Certain Personnel in Civil Service

  • Signed: January 31, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 497, February 2, 1939
  • Amends: EO 7916, June 24, 1938
  • Amended by: EO 8371, March 9, 1940
  • See: EO 8699, March 1, 1941 EO 9230, August 20, 1942

Executive Order 8045
Authorizing the Appointment of Frederick Morgan Davenport to a Classified Position in the Civil Service Commission and Designating Him as a Member and Chairman of the Council of Personnel Administration

  • Signed: February 8, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 695, February 11, 1939
  • Amends: EO 7916, June 24, 1938

Executive Order 8046
Exemption of Louis A. Simon From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: February 11, 1939
  • Amends: EO 7581, March 19, 1937 EO 7824, February 25, 1938
  • Amended by: EO 8369, March 7, 1940 EO 8747, April 28, 1941
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8047
Exemption of Edward B. Russ From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: February 11, 1939
  • Amends: EO 7791, January 13, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8048
Exemption of John G. Crane From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: February 14, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8049
Exemption of George W. Patterson From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: February 15, 1939
  • Amends: EO 7819, February 17, 1938
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8050
Exemption of Robert F. Whitehead From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: February 15, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8051
Limiting the Importation of Red Cedar Shingles From Canada During the First Six Months of 1939

  • Signed: February 15, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 959, February 18, 1939
  • See: EO 7701, September 3, 1937 EO 7822, February 25, 1938 EO 7946, August 9, 1938

Executive Order 8052
Designating the Honorable Angel R. de Jesus as Acting Judge of the District Court of the United States for Puerto Rico

Executive Order 8053
Partial Revocation of Executive Orders of January 24, 1914 California and Oregon

  • Signed: February 23, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1023, January 28, 1939
  • Amends: Executive orders of January 24, 1914 (unnumbered series)

Executive Order 8054
Placing Certain Land Under the Control and Jurisdiction of the Secretary of the Treasury Alaska

Executive Order 8055
Transfer of Jurisdiction Over Certain Lands From the Secretary of Agriculture to the Secretary of the Interior

  • Signed: February 23, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1024, February 28, 1939
  • Amends: EO 7908, June 9, 1938
  • Amended by: Public Land Order 248, August 10, 1944 (9 FR 12656)

Executive Order 8056
Amendment of Paragraph 4, Subdivision IV, Schedule B, Civil Service Rules

Executive Order 8057
Transfer of Certain Lands From the Secretary of Agriculture to the Secretary of the Interior Virginia

  • Signed: February 23, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1025, February 28, 1939
  • Amends: EO 7908, June 9, 1938

Executive Order 8058
Exemption of Alex Hrdlicka From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: February 23, 1939
  • See: EO 8368, March 7, 1940 EO 8710, March 12, 1941
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8059
Transferring the Use, Possession, and Control of Certain Lands to the Tennessee Valley Authority Alabama

  • Signed: March 3, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1119, March 7, 1939
  • Amends: EO 2246, September 17, 1915 EO 6964, February 5, 1935

Executive Order 8060
Exemption of Fred C. Bailey From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: March 7, 1939
  • Amended by: EO 8345, February 12, 1940
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8061
Transferring Certain Land to the Control and Jurisdiction of the Treasury Department Virgin Islands

  • Signed: March 7, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1181, March 10, 1939
  • Amends: EO 5602, April 20, 1931

Executive Order 8062
Tariff of Fees of Officers of United States Court for China

  • Signed: March 7, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1181, March 10, 1939
  • Supersedes: EO 3572, November 1, 1921

Executive Order 8063
Authorizing Initial Appointments to Certain Executive Positions in the Railroad Retirement Board Without Compliance With the Civil Service Rules

Executive Order 8064
Designating Fairbanks, Alaska, as a Customs Port of Entry, and Discontinuing Seward, Alaska, as a Customs Port of Entry

Executive Order 8065
Establishing the Necedah Migratory Waterfowl Refuge Wisconsin

  • Signed: March 14, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1241, March 17, 1939
  • Amends: EO 6964, February 5, 1935
  • Amended by: EO 8319, January 15, 1940 EO 8479, July 11, 1940
  • Revoked by: Public Land Order 1785, February 3, 1959 (24 FR 972) (in part)

Executive Order 8066
Ratification of Appointments of Walter Kearney and Stanley D. Zaveckas to State Department

  • Signed: March 17, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8067
Establishing the Carolina Sandhills Wildlife Refuge South Carolina

Executive Order 8068
Amendment of Rules 17 and 18 of Executive Order No. 4314 of September 25, 1925, Establishing Rules Governing Navigation of the Panama Canal and Adjacent Waters

  • Signed: March 20, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1258, March 21, 1939
  • Amends: EO 4314, September 25, 1925

Executive Order 8069
Revoking the Designation of Gateway, Montana, as a Customs Port of Entry

Executive Order 8070
Exemption of Sims Ely From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: March 21, 1939
  • Amended by: EO 8351, February 25, 1940
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8071
Establishing the Federal Interdepartmental Safety Council

  • Signed: March 21, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1291, March 23, 1939
  • Revoked by: EO 10194, December 19, 1950

Executive Order 8072
Withdrawal of Public Land for Use of the Navy Department for Naval Aviation Purposes Washington

  • Signed: March 21, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1291, March 23, 1939
  • Amends: EO 6964, February 5, 1935
  • Revoked by: Public Land Order 1068, February 9, 1955 (20 FR 972)

Executive Order 8073
Exemption of Newton C. Lammond From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: March 23, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8074
Exemption of George K. Larrison From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: March 25, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8075
Exemption of Glenn S. Smith From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: April 4, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8076
Amending the Foreign Service Regulations of the United States

  • Signed: April 4, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1473, April 7, 1939
  • Revoked by: EO 9521, February 13, 1945

Executive Order 8077
Amending the Foreign Service Regulations of the United States

  • Signed: April 4, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1474, April 7, 1939
  • Revoked by: EO 9521, February 13, 1945

Executive Order 8078
Amending the Foreign Service Regulations of the United States

  • Signed: April 4, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1475, April 7, 1939
  • Revoked by: EO 8396, April 18, 1940

Executive Order 8079
Changing the Name of the Customs Port of Entry of Mars Hill, Maine, to Bridgewater, Maine

  • Signed: April 4, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1475, April 7, 1939
  • Amends: EO 4340, November 11, 1925

Executive Order 8080
Revoking the Designation of Fair Haven, New York, as a Customs Port of Entry

Executive Order 8081
Establishing the Anclote Migratory Bird Refuge Florida

  • Signed: April 5, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1475, April 7, 1939
  • Amends: Executive order of February 1, 1886 (unnumbered series)
  • Amended by: Proclamation. 2416
  • See: Public Land Order 319, May 15, 1946 (11 FR 5745) Public Land Order 1243, October 26, 1955 (20 FR 8192)

Executive Order 8082
Appointment of Mrs. Esther H. Soter to a Classified Position in Federal Trade Commission

  • Signed: April 8, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8083
Extending the Provisions of the Civil Service Retirement Act to Certain Federal Employees, and Amending Civil Service Rule II

  • Signed: April 10, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1577, April 12, 1939
  • Revoked by: EO 9830, February 24, 1947

Executive Order 8084
Amending the Foreign Service Regulations of the United States

  • Signed: April 11, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1595, April 13, 1939
  • Revokes: EO 170, March 24, 1902
  • Revoked by: EO 9521, February 13, 1945

Executive Order 8085
Withdrawal of Public Land for Forest Ranger Station Colorado

  • Signed: April 11, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1597, April 13, 1939
  • Revoked by: Public Land Order 5690, December 11, 1979 (44 FR 74836)

Executive Order 8086
Establishing the Morgan Farm Wildlife Refuge Vermont

  • Signed: April 11, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1611, April 14, 1939
  • Revoked by: Public Land Order 801, February 5, 1952 (17 FR 1357)

Executive Order 8087
Excluding Certain Tracts of Land From the Chugach and Tongass National Forests and Restoring Them to Entry Alaska

Executive Order 8088
Revocation of Executive Order No. 5789 of February 2, 1932, and Partial Revocation of Executive Order No. 5792 of February 2, 1932, Withdrawing Public Lands California and Nevada

  • Signed: April 12, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1612, April 14, 1939
  • Amends: EO 5792, February 2, 1932
  • Revokes: EO 5789, February 2, 1932

Executive Order 8089
Withdrawal of Public Lands for Use of the War Department for Flood Control Purposes Oklahoma

  • Signed: April 13, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1619, April 15, 1939
  • Amends: EO 6964, February 5, 1935
  • Revoked by: Public Land Order 144, June 24, 1943 (8 FR 9430) (in part)

Executive Order 8090
Restoring to the Commonwealth of the Philippines a Part of the Military Reservation of Nozaleda

Executive Order 8091
Modifying Executive Order No. 2224 of July 19, 1915, and Reserving Certain Lands for Use of the Department of Agriculture Alaska

  • Signed: April 15, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1641, April 19, 1939
  • Revoked by: Public Land Order 2475, September 5, 1961 (26 FR 8513) (in part)

Executive Order 8092
Amendment of Schedule B of the Civil Service Rules

Executive Order 8093
Revocation of Executive Order No. 6119 of May 2, 1933, Withdrawing Public Lands California

  • Signed: April 17, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1649, April 20, 1939
  • Revokes: EO 6119, May 2, 1933

Executive Order 8094
Exemption of Zeke Johnson From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: April 19, 1939
  • Amended by: EO 8293, November 30, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8095
Transfer of Jurisdiction Over Certain Lands From the Secretary of Agriculture to the Secretary of the Interior, and Withdrawal of Lands From the Public Domain for the Use of the Department of Agriculture New Mexico

  • Signed: April 19, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1662, April 21, 1939
  • Amends: EO 7908, June 9, 1938
  • Revoked by: Public Land Order 2593, January 19, 1962 (27 FR 778) (in part)

Executive Order 8096
Exemption of William C. Shambaugh From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: April 21, 1939
  • Amended by: EO 8414, May 18, 1940
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8097
Exemption of Charles J. Carlton From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: April 24, 1939
  • Amends: EO 7876, April 26, 1938
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8098
Revocation of Executive Order No. 5538 of January 23, 1931, Withdrawing Public Lands Colorado

  • Signed: April 24, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1697, April 27, 1939
  • Revokes: EO 5538, January 23, 1931

Executive Order 8099
Administration of Benefits Provided by Act of Congress Approved April 3, 1939

  • Signed: April 28, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1725, May 2, 1939
  • Amended by: EO 8461, June 28, 1940 EO 9051, February 6, 1942 EO 10122, April 15, 1950

Executive Order 8100
Enlarging the Homochitto National Forest Mississippi

  • Signed: April 28, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1725, May 2, 1939
  • Amends: EO 6964, February 5, 1935

Executive Order 8101
Withdrawal of Public Land for Use of the War Department as a Target Range for the Wyoming National Guard Wyoming

  • Signed: April 28, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1725, May 2, 1939
  • Amends: EO 6910, November 26, 1934
  • Amended by: EO 9526, February 28, 1945

Executive Order 8102
Withdrawal of Public Lands for Use as a Military Reservation Alaska

  • Signed: April 29, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1726, May 2, 1939
  • Amended by: EO 9526, February 28, 1945 Public Land Order 2676, May 4, 1962 (27 FR 4516) Public Land Order 2962, March 5, 1963 (28 FR 2310) Public Land Order 6534, May 4, 1984 (49 FR 20815)
  • Revoked by: Public Land Order 549, January 31, 1949 (14 FR 546) (in part) Public Land Order 1762, December 2, 1958 (23 FR 9485) (in part) Public Land Order 1780, February 3, 1959 (24 FR 947) (in part) Public Land Order 2134, June 23, 1960 (25 FR 6018) (in part) Public Land Order 2272, February 23, 1961 (26 FR 1831) (in part) Public Land Order 3128, July 9, 1963 (28 FR 7226) (in part) Public Land Order 3222, September 17, 1963 (28 FR 10156) (in part) Public Land Order 3919, January 18, 1966 (31 FR 902) (in part) Public Land Order 3960, March 30, 1966 (31 FR 5430) (in part)
  • See: Public Land Order 274, April 17, 1945 (10 FR 4505)

Executive Order 8103
Amendment of Executive Order No. 7302 of February 21, 1936, Transferring Certain Lands to the Control and Jurisdiction of the Secretary of the Navy

  • Signed: May 2, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1771, May 4, 1939
  • Amends: EO 7302, February 21, 1936 EO 7686, August 5, 1937 EO 7790, January 12, 1938
  • Amended by: EO 8201, July 11, 1939

Executive Order 8104
Establishing the Little Pend Oreille Wildlife Refuge Washington

  • Signed: May 2, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1771, May 4, 1939
  • Amends: EO 6964, February 5, 1935 EO 7693, August 19, 1937

Executive Order 8105
Exemption of Herbert E. Lucas From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: May 3, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8106
Exemption of Frank B. Bourn From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: May 3, 1939
  • See: EO 7863, April 7, 1938
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8107
Amendment of Executive Order No. 7293 of February 14, 1936, as Amended by Executive Order No. 7831 of March 7, 1938, Prescribing Regulations Governing the Granting of Allowances for Quarters and Subsistence to Enlisted Men

  • Signed: May 3, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1903, May 5, 1939
  • Amends: EO 7293, February 14, 1936 EO 7831, March 7, 1938
  • Amended by: EO 8440, June 12, 1940
  • Suspended by: EO 8704, March 4, 1941

Executive Order 8108
Revocation of Executive Order No. 6644 of March 14, 1934, Withdrawing Public Lands Colorado

  • Signed: May 3, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1903, May 5, 1939
  • Revokes: EO 6644, March 14, 1934

Executive Order 8109
Connecting the Description of the Walanae-Kai Military Reservation and Restoring a Part Thereof to the Territory of Hawaii

  • Signed: May 3, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1903, May 5, 1939
  • Amends: EO 7010, April 10, 1935
  • Amended by: EO 10664, April 2, 1956
  • Revoked by: EO 10688, November 16, 1956
  • See: EO 2900, July 2, 1918 EO 5414, July 31, 1930

Executive Order 8110
Establishing the Appert Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

Executive Order 8111
Establishing Billings Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

  • Signed: May 10, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1993, May 12, 1939
  • Revoked by: Public Land Order 4017, May 2, 1966 (31 FR 7567)

Executive Order 8112
Establishing Bone Hill Creek Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

Executive Order 8113
Establishing Buffalo Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

Executive Order 8114
Establishing the Camp Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

Executive Order 8115
Establishing Canfield Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

Executive Order 8116
Establishing Charles Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

  • Signed: May 10, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1995, May 12, 1939
  • Revoked by: Public Land Order 2292, March 6, 1961 (26 FR 2125)

Executive Order 8117
Establishing Dakota Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

Executive Order 8118
Establishing the Flickertail Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

Executive Order 8119
Establishing Florence Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

Executive Order 8120
Establishing the Half-Way Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

Executive Order 8121
Establishing the Hutchinson Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

Executive Order 8122
Establishing the Johnson Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

Executive Order 8123
Establishing the Lake Moraine Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

  • Signed: May 10, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1996, May 12, 1939
  • Revoked by: Public Land Order 1704, August 4, 1958 (23 FR 6110)

Executive Order 8124
Establishing the Lake Oliver Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

  • Signed: May 10, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1996, May 12, 1939
  • Revoked by: Public Land Order 6117, January 28, 1982 (47 FR 5422)

Executive Order 8125
Establishing the Little Goose Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

Executive Order 8126
Establishing the Little Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

  • Signed: May 10, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1997, May 12, 1939
  • Revoked by: Public Land Order 1704, August 4, 1958 (23 FR 6110)

Executive Order 8127
Establishing Lords Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

Executive Order 8128
Establishing Lost Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

Executive Order 8129
Establishing Minnewastena Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

  • Signed: May 10, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 1997, May 12, 1939
  • Revoked by: Public Land Order 1704, August 4, 1958 (23 FR 6110)

Executive Order 8130
Transfer of Lands From the Cache National Forest to the Caribou National Forest Idaho

Executive Order 8131
Inspection of Income, Excess-Profits, and Capital Stock Tax Returns by the Special Committee on Un-American Activities, House of Representatives

  • Signed: May 11, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2025, May 16, 1939
  • See: EO 7933-A, July 14, 1938 EO 9281, December 9, 1942

Executive Order 8132
Exemption of Lilian M. Lamb From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: May 12, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8133
Further Amending Executive Order No. 7677-A of July 26, 1937, as Amended, Entitled "Civilian Conservation Corps"

  • Signed: May 15, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2043, May 17, 1939
  • Amends: EO 7677-A, July 26, 1937
  • Amended by: EO 8221, August 21, 1939
  • See: EO 7717, September 29, 1937

Executive Order 8134
Modification of Executive Order No. 6746 of June 21, 1934, as Modified, Prescribing Rates of Compensation of Government Employees in Emergency Agencies, Etc.

  • Signed: May 15, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2043, May 17, 1939
  • Amends: EO 6746, June 21, 1934

Executive Order 8135
Appeals From Decisions of the Auditor General of the Philippines to the President of the United States

  • Signed: May 15, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2043, May 17, 1939
  • Amended by: EO 8445, June 15, 1940

Executive Order 8136
Delegating Certain Powers to the Attorney General and Directing the Secretary of the Treasury To Sell Certain Securities

  • Signed: May 15, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2044, May 17, 1939
  • Amends: EO 6981, March 2, 1935
  • See: EO 6694, May 1, 1934 EO 9142, April 21, 1942

Executive Order 8137
Authorizing the Extension of Appointments of Certain Employees of the General Accounting Office

  • Signed: May 17, 1939
  • See: EO 7913, June 16, 1938 EO 8456, June 27, 1940 EO 8457, June 27, 1940
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8138
Partial Revocation of Executive Order of July 9, 1910, Creating Coal Land Withdrawal, Montana No. 1

  • Signed: May 17, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2067, May 19, 1939
  • Revokes: Executive order of July 9, 1910 (unnumbered series) (in part)

Executive Order 8139
Exemption of James E. Harper From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: May 19, 1939
  • See: EO 8422, May 28, 1940 EO 8804, June 25, 1940
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8140
Restoring Lands to Territory of Hawaii for Road Purposes and Reserving Lands for Military Purposes, Punchbowl Hill Military Reservation

Executive Order 8141
Transferring the Use, Possession, and Control of Certain Lands to the Tennessee Valley Authority Alabama

Executive Order 8142
Exemption of Thomas A. Jaggar, Jr., From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: May 25, 1939
  • See: EO 7936, July 30, 1938
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8143
Establishing a Defensive Sea Area in and About Pearl Harbor Hawaii

Executive Order 8144
Partial Revocation of Executive Order of July 2, 1910, Creating Petroleum Reserve No. 7, Utah No. 1. Petroleum Restoration No. 61 Utah

  • Signed: May 26, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2179, May 30, 1939
  • Revokes: Executive order of July 2, 1910 (unnumbered series) (in part)

Executive Order 8145
Changing the Name of the Nine-Pipe Reservation to Nine-Pipe Migratory Waterfowl Refuge and Adding Certain Lands Thereto

  • Signed: May 31, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2201, June 2, 1939
  • Amends: EO 3503, June 25, 1921

Executive Order 8146
Reinstatement of Former Foreign Service Officer Paul H. Alling

  • Signed: June 12, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8147
Establishing the Ardoch Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

Executive Order 8148
Establishing the Brumba Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

Executive Order 8149
Establishing the Cottonwood Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

Executive Order 8150
Establishing the Hiddenwood Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

Executive Order 8151
Establishing the Hobart Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

Executive Order 8152
Establishing Lake Elsie Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

Executive Order 8153
Establishing Lake George Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

  • Signed: June 12, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2407, June 15, 1939
  • Revokes: EO 6910, November 26, 1934 (in part)

Executive Order 8154
Establishing Lake Ilo Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

Executive Order 8155
Establishing the Lake Nettie Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

Executive Order 8156
Establishing Lake Patricia Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

Executive Order 8157
Establishing the Lake Susie Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

Executive Order 8158
Establishing the Lake Zahl Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

  • Signed: June 12, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2408, June 15, 1939
  • Revokes: EO 6910, November 26, 1934 (in part)

Executive Order 8159
Establishing the Lambs Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

Executive Order 8160
Establishing Legion Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

  • Signed: June 12, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2408, June 15, 1939
  • Revoked by: Public Land Order 1211, September 6, 1955 (20 FR 6707)

Executive Order 8161
Enlarging the Long Lake Migratory Bird Refuge North Dakota

  • Signed: June 12, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2408, June 15, 1939
  • See: EO 5808, February 25, 1932 EO 5914, August 26, 1932

Executive Order 8162
Establishing the Maple River Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

Executive Order 8163
Establishing Pioneer Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

  • Signed: June 12, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2409, June 15, 1939
  • Revoked by: Public Land Order 1704, August 4, 1958 (23 FR 6110)

Executive Order 8164
Establishing the Pleasant Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

Executive Order 8165
Establishing Rock Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

Executive Order 8166
Establishing Shell Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

Executive Order 8167
Establishing the Sibley Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge North Dakota

Executive Order 8168
Transferring From the Department of Agriculture to the Department of Commerce Certain Lands at Sitka, Alaska, for Use as a Magnetic and Seismological Observatory Site by the Bureau of Coast and Geodetic Survey

  • Signed: June 14, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2415, June 16, 1939
  • Revokes: Executive order of August 12, 1898 (unnumbered series)
  • Revoked by: EO 8854, August 16, 1941

Executive Order 8169
Partial Revocation of Executive Order No. 6153 of June 3, 1933, Withdrawing Public Lands Colorado

  • Signed: June 14, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2415, June 16, 1939
  • Revokes: EO 6153, June 3, 1933 (in part)

Executive Order 8170
Appointment of A. Sidney Johnson to a Classified Position in the Treasury Department

  • Signed: June 15, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8171
Transfer of Jurisdiction Over Certain Lands From the Secretary of Agriculture to the Secretary of War

  • Signed: June 15, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2443, June 20, 1939
  • See: EO 7908, June 9, 1938

Executive Order 8172
Excluding Certain Tracts of Land From the Chugach and Tongass National Forests and Restoring Them to Entry

Executive Order 8173
Establishing the Talcot Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge Minnesota

  • Signed: June 15, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2444, June 20, 1939
  • Revoked by: Public Land Order 1660, June 18, 1958 (23 FR 4621)
  • See: Proc. 2416, July 25, 1940

Executive Order 8174
Amending Executive Order No. 6901 of November 13, 1934 Withdrawing Public Land as a Wildlife Administrative Site Alaska

  • Signed: June 15, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2445, June 20, 1939
  • Amends: EO 6901, November 13, 1934
  • See: Public Land Order 2681, May 23, 1962 (27 FR 5095)

Executive Order 8175
Partial Revocation of Executive Order of March 21, 1914 Wyoming

  • Signed: June 21, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2467, June 23, 1939
  • Revokes: Executive order of March 21, 1914 (unnumbered series) (in part)

Executive Order 8176
Regulations Governing the Grades and Ratings of Enlisted Men of the Regular Army for the Fiscal Year 1940

  • Signed: June 21, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2467, June 23, 1939
  • Amended by: EO 8281, November 1, 1939

Executive Order 8177
Amending the Foreign Service Regulations of the United States

  • Signed: June 21, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2467, June 23, 1939
  • Revoked by: EO 8396, April 18, 1940

Executive Order 8178
Partial Revocation of Executive Order of August 2, 1875, Withdrawing Public Land Florida

  • Signed: June 21, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2468, June 23, 1939
  • Revokes: Executive order of August 2, 1875 (unnumbered series) (in part)

Executive Order 8179
Amending Certain Provisions of the Civil Service Rules

  • Signed: June 21, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2468, June 23, 1939
  • Revoked by: EO 9830, February 24, 1947

Executive Order 8180
Effective Date of Election by Retired Foreign Service Officers To Receive Reduced Annuities

Executive Order 8181
Amending the Foreign Service Regulations of the United States

  • Signed: June 22, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2491, June 27, 1939
  • Revokes: EO 5956, December 1, 1932
  • Revoked by: EO 9521, February 13, 1945

Executive Order 8182
Postponement of Effective Date of Certain Provisions of Executive Order No. 6166 of June 10, 1933

  • Signed: June 28, 1939
  • Amends: EO 6166, June 10, 1933
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8183
Excusing Federal Employees From Duty on July 3, 1939

Executive Order 8184
Amending Executive Order No. 7532 of January 8, 1937, Establishing the Shinnecock Migratory Bird Refuge

  • Signed: June 28, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2699, June 30, 1939
  • Amends: EO 7532, January 8, 1937

Executive Order 8185
Administration of the Foreign Service Under Reorganization Plan No. II

  • Signed: June 29, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2749, July 6, 1939
  • Amends: EO 5642, June 8, 1931
  • Amended by: EO 8396, April 18, 1940

Executive Order 8186
Transferring to the Federal Works Administrator the Functions Transferred to the Secretary of the Treasury by Executive Order No. 7641 of June 22, 1937

  • Signed: June 29, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2749, July 6, 1939
  • Supersedes: EO 7641, June 22, 1937
  • See: EO 2889, June 18, 1918

Executive Order 8187
Amendment of Subdivision VI, Schedule A. of the Civil Service Rules

Executive Order 8188
Revocation of Executive Order No. 4539 of November 6, 1926, Withdrawing Public Lands Utah

  • Signed: June 29, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2749, July 6, 1939
  • Revokes: EO 4539, November 6, 1926

Executive Order 8189
Amending the Foreign Service Regulations of the United States

  • Signed: July 5, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2783, July 7, 1939
  • Revokes: EO 5469, October 22, 1930 EO 5624, May 15, 1931 EO 5707, September 4, 1931 EO 7013, April 16, 1935
  • Amended by: EO 9431, March 20, 1944
  • Revoked by: EO 9521, February 13, 1945

Executive Order 8190
Placing the Committee for Reciprocity Information Under the Jurisdiction and Control of the Department of State

  • Signed: July 5, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2785, July 7, 1939
  • Revoked by: EO 9647, October 25, 1945
  • See: EO 6656, March 27, 1934 EO 6750, June 27, 1934 EO 7260, December 31, 1935

Executive Order 8191
Placing the Goethals Memorial Commission Under the Jurisdiction and Control of the War Department

Executive Order 8192
Partial Revocation of Executive Order No. 2608 of May 4, 1917, and Rewithdrawal for Use by the Forest as an Addition to an Existing Administrative Site Alaska

  • Signed: July 5, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2785, July 7, 1939
  • Revokes: EO 2608, May 14, 1917 (in part)
  • Revoked by: Public Land Order 829, May 16, 1952 (17 FR 4709)

Executive Order 8193
Partial Revocation of Executive Order No. 5894 of July 26, 1932, Withdrawing Public Land Colorado

  • Signed: July 5, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2786, July 7, 1939
  • Revokes: EO 5894, July 26, 1932 (in part)

Executive Order 8193-A
Assignment of Frequencies to Government Radio Stations

  • Signed: July 5, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2897, July 11, 1939
  • Supersedes: EO 7251, December 19, 1935

Executive Order 8194
Placing the Federal Fire Council Under the Federal Works Agency

  • Signed: July 6, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2786, July 7, 1939
  • Revoked by: EO 10257, June 23, 1951
  • See: EO 7397, June 20, 1936

Executive Order 8195
Exemption of Frederick S. Jackson From Compulsory Retirement for Age

Executive Order 8196
Amending the Foreign Service Regulations of the United States

  • Signed: July 8, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2911, July 11, 1939
  • Revokes: EO 724, January 3, 1908 EO 2483, November 5, 1916
  • Revoked by: EO 9521, February 13, 1945

Executive Order 8197
Regulations Pertaining to the Administration of the Act of May 3, 1939, Public No. 63, 76th Congress, 1st Session

  • Signed: July 11, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2953, July 13, 1939
  • Amended by: EO 9190, July 2, 1942

Executive Order 8198
Suspension of Eight-Hour Law as to Construction of Certain Emergency Air Bases

Executive Order 8199
Partial Revocation of Executive Orders of July 9, 1910, May 18, 1911, August 25, 1915, and May 22, 1917, Creating, Respectively, Coal Land Withdrawals Nos. 1, 6, 8, and 10

  • Signed: July 11, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2954, July 13, 1939
  • Revokes: Executive order of July 9, 1910 (unnumbered series) (in part) Executive order of May 18, 1911 (unnumbered series) (in part) Executive order of August 25, 1915 (unnumbered series) (in part) Executive order of May 22, 1917 (unnumbered series) (in part)

Executive Order 8200
Partial Revocation of Executive Order No. 5886 of July 12, 1932, Withdrawing Public Lands Wyoming

  • Signed: July 11, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2955, July 13, 1939
  • Revokes: EO 5886, July 12, 1932 (in part)

Executive Order 8201
Amendment of Executive Order No. 7302 of February 21, 1936, Transferring Certain Lands to the Control and Jurisdiction of the Secretary of the Navy Virgin Islands

  • Signed: July 11, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 2955, July 13, 1939
  • Amends: EO 7302, February 21, 1936 EO 7686, August 5, 1937 EO 7790, January 12, 1938 EO 8103, May 2, 1939

Executive Order 8202
Authorizing and Requesting the Federal Power Commission To Perform Certain Functions Relating to the Transmission of Electric Energy Between the United States and Foreign Countries and to the Exportation and Importation of Natural Gas From and Into the United States

  • Signed: July 13, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 3243, July 15, 1939
  • Revoked by: EO 10485, September 3, 1953
  • See: EO 9276, December 2, 1942 EO 9332, April 19, 1943

Executive Order 8203
Transfer of Jurisdiction Over Certain Lands From the Secretary of Agriculture to the Secretary of War

  • Signed: July 13, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 3243, July 15, 1939
  • See: EO 7908, June 9, 1938

Executive Order 8204
Exemption of Michael E. Gorman From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: July 14, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8205
Authorizing the Initial Appointment of the Assistant Administrator of the Federal Security Agency and One Private Secretary to the Assistant Administrator Without Compliance With the Civil Service Rules, and Amending Schedule A of the Civil Service Rules

Executive Order 8206
Revocation of Executive Order No. 6432 of November 16, 1933, Withdrawing Public Lands Wyoming

  • Signed: July 14, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 3313, July 18, 1939
  • Revokes: EO 6432, November 16, 1933

Executive Order 8207
Exemption of Dr. George F. Bowerman From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: July 17, 1939
  • Amends: EO 7892, May 18, 1938
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8208
Exemption of Mrs. Frances S. Nichols From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: July 17, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8209
Exemption of William M. Smith From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: July 17, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8210
Amending the Foreign Service Regulations of the United States

  • Signed: July 17, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 3367, July 20, 1939
  • Revokes: EO 5661, July 1, 1931
  • Revoked by: EO 9521, February 13, 1945

Executive Order 8211
Revocation of Executive Order No. 5633 of May 28, 1931, Withdrawing Public Lands

  • Signed: July 19, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 3395, July 22, 1939
  • Revokes: EO 5633, May 28, 1931

Executive Order 8212
Reinstatement of Former Foreign Service Officer James J. Murphy, Jr.

  • Signed: July 25, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8213
Exemption of Erastus S. Hawkins From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: July 25, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8214
Providing Additional Time-Eligibility for Reinstatement Under Civil Service Rules of Certain Former Federal Employees

  • Signed: July 25, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 3429, July 27, 1939
  • Revoked by: EO 9830, February 24, 1947

Executive Order 8215
Amendment of Section 15 of Executive Order No. 1888 of February 2, 1914, Prescribing General Conditions of Employment for Employees of the Panama Canal and the Panama Railroad Company on the Isthmus of Panama

  • Signed: July 25, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 3430, July 27, 1939
  • Amends: EO 1888, February 2, 1914
  • See: EO 9212, August 1, 1942

Executive Order 8216
Withdrawing Public Land and Water for Naval Purposes Alaska

  • Signed: July 25, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 3430, July 27, 1939
  • Revokes: Executive order of October 30, 1901 (unnumbered series)
  • Revoked by: Public Land Order 925, October 27, 1953 (18 FR 6942) (in part) Public Land Order 3033, April 12, 1963 (28 FR 3855)

Executive Order 8217
Exemption of George Middleton From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: August 7, 1939
  • See: EO 7978, September 19, 1938
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8218
Exemption of Herbert Vansant From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: August 7, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8219
Designating the Secretary of Agriculture as the Officer To Exercise the Rights of the United States Arising Out of the Ownership of the Capital Stock of the Commodity Credit Corporation

  • Signed: August 7, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 3565, August 10, 1939
  • Amends: EO 7848, March 22, 1938

Executive Order 8220
Partial Revocation of Certain Executive Orders Creating Temporary Power-Site Withdrawals and Power-Site Reserves Oregon

  • Signed: August 7, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 3565, August 10, 1939
  • Revokes: Executive order of December 30, 1909 (unnumbered series) (in part) Executive order of July 2, 1910 (unnumbered series) (in part)

Executive Order 8221
Further Amending Executive Order No. 7677-A, of July 26, 1937, as Amended, Entitled "Civilian Conservation Corps"

  • Signed: August 21, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 3715, August 25, 1939
  • Amends: EO 7677-A, July 26, 1937 EO 7717, September 29, 1937 EO 8133, May 15, 1939

Executive Order 8222
Exempting Certain Positions From Salary Classification

  • Signed: August 21, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 3715, August 25, 1939
  • See: EO 6746, June 21, 1934

Executive Order 8223
Modifying Executive Order No. 1919 1/2 of April 21, 1914, and Reserving Certain Lands for Use of the Alaska Road Commission for Aviation Field Purposes Alaska

  • Signed: August 21, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 3716, August 25, 1939
  • Amends: EO 1919 1/2, April 21, 1914
  • Revoked by: Public Land Order 716, May 1, 1951 (16 FR 4138)

Executive Order 8224
Exemption of John P. Dunlop From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: August 24, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8225
Abolishing Customs Collection District Number 44 (Iowa) Extending Limits of Customs Collection District Number 39 (Chicago) To Include the State of Iowa and Revoking the Designations of Des Moines, Iowa, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, and Tulsa, Oklahoma, as Customs Ports of Entry

Executive Order 8226
Amending Section 15 of Executive Order No. 7845 of March 21, 1938, Prescribing Regulations Relating to Annual Leave of Government Employees

  • Signed: August 24, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 3722, August 26, 1939
  • Amends: EO 7845, March 21, 1938
  • Revoked by: EO 8384, March 29, 1940

Executive Order 8227
Amending Section 18 of Executive Order No. 7846 of March 21, 1938, Prescribing Regulations Relating to Sick Leave of Government Employees

  • Signed: August 24, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 3722, August 26, 1939
  • Amends: EO 7846, March 21, 1938
  • Revoked by: EO 8385, March 29, 1940

Executive Order 8228
Exemption of William T. Andrews From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: August 24, 1939
  • Amended by: EO 8554, September 28, 1940
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8229
Promotion of Lieutenant Harry R. Lohman, District of Columbia Police Force, Without Regard to Civil Service Rules

  • Signed: August 26, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8230
Authorizing the Inspection of Certain Returns Made Under the Internal Revenue Code

Executive Order 8231
Exemption of Edward M. Weeks From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: August 31, 1939
  • See: EO 7413, July 10, 1936 EO 7635, June 16, 1937 EO 7945, August 4, 1936
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8232
Control of the Panama Canal and the Canal Zone

  • Signed: September 5, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 3812, September 6, 1939
  • Revoked by: EO 10107, February 8, 1950
  • See: EO 8251, September 12, 1939

Executive Order 8233
Prescribing Regulations Governing the Enforcement of the Neutrality of the United States

  • Signed: September 5, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 3822, September 7, 1939
  • Amended by: EO 8398, April 25, 1940 EO 8406, May 11, 1940 EO 8433, June 10, 1940
  • See: EO 8243, September 8, 1939 EO 8249, September 10, 1939 Proc. 2348

Executive Order 8234
Prescribing Regulations Governing the Passage and Control of Vessels Through the Panama Canal in Any War in Which the United States is Neutral

  • Signed: September 5, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 3823, September 7, 1939
  • Amended by: EO 8382, March 25, 1940

Executive Order 8235
Appointment of Mrs. Coey Custer Jones to Public Health Service Without Regard to Civil Service Rules

  • Signed: September 6, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8236
Authorizing the Inspection of Certain Income Tax Withholding Returns by the Department of National Revenue, Ottawa, Canada

Executive Order 8237
Amending Subdivision XVI of Schedule A of the Civil Service Rules

Executive Order 8238
Extending the Limits of the Customs Port of Entry of Baltimore, Maryland, in Customs Collection District Number 13 (Maryland), To Include Sparrows Point, Maryland

Executive Order 8239
Power Site Restoration No. 492, Partial Revocation of Executive Orders of December 19, 1910, Creating Power Site Reserve No. 165 and of January 23, 1912, Creating Power Site Reserve No. 241

  • Signed: September 6, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 3836, September 8, 1939
  • Revokes: Executive order of December 19, 1910 (unnumbered series) (in part) Executive order of January 23, 1912 (unnumbered series) (in part) Executive order of December 3, 1912 (unnumbered series) (in part) Executive order of August 25, 1915 (unnumbered series) (in part) Executive order of August 29, 1919 (unnumbered series) (in part)

Executive Order 8240
Construction of Executive Order of September 16, 1889, Enlarging Fort Meade Wood and Timber Military Reservation South Dakota

  • Signed: September 6, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 3836, September 8, 1939
  • Amends: EO 4244, June 5, 1925
  • See: Executive order of September 16, 1889 (unnumbered series)

Executive Order 8241
Revocation of Executive Order No. 6774 of June 30, 1934, Withdrawing Public Lands Washington

Executive Order 8242
Transfer of Miss Charlotta Gallap to Federal Communications Commission Without Regard to Civil Service Rules

  • Signed: September 7, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8243
Prescribing Regulations Governing the Enforcement of the Neutrality of the United States

Executive Order 8244
Authorizing an Increase in the Strength of the Army

Executive Order 8245
Authorizing Increases in the Enlisted Strengths of the Navy and the Marine Corps

Executive Order 8246
Making Funds Available for the Protection of American Citizens in Foreign Countries During the Existing Emergency

Executive Order 8247
Authorizing Increases in the Personnel of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Department of Justice

Executive Order 8248
Establishing the Divisions of the Executive Office of the President and Defining Their Functions and Duties

  • Signed: September 8, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 3864, September 12, 1939
  • Amended by: EO 12608, September 9, 1987
  • Revoked by: EO 10452, May 1, 1953 (in part) EO 12919, June 3, 1994 (in part)

Executive Order 8249
Prescribing Regulations Governing the Enforcement of the Neutrality of the United States

Executive Order 8250
Revocation of Executive Order No. 2006 of July 30, 1914, Placing Certain Land Under the Jurisdiction of the Secretary of the Navy for Use as a Naval Radio Station

  • Signed: September 11, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 3890, September 13, 1939
  • Revokes: EO 2006, July 30, 1914

Executive Order 8251
Regulations Governing the Entrance of Foreign and Domestic Aircraft Into the Canal Zone, and Navigation Therein

  • Signed: September 12, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 3899, September 14, 1939
  • Revokes: EO 4971, September 28, 1928
  • Amended by: EO 8271, October 16, 1939
  • Superseded by: Canal Zone Order 3, January 21, 1947 (12 FR 898)
  • See: EO 8232, September 5, 1939 Proc. 2350, September 5, 1939

Executive Order 8252
Exemption of Samuel J. Gompers From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: September 14, 1939
  • Amended by: EO 8543, September 18, 1940
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8253
Exemption of Walter I. Swanton From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: September 18, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8254
Authorizing Increases in the Personnel and Facilities of the United States Coast Guard, Treasury Department

Executive Order 8255
Transfer of Control and Jurisdiction Over Certain Lands From the Secretary of Agriculture to the Secretary of the Interior

Executive Order 8256
Exemption of Maurice C. Latta From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: September 20, 1939
  • See: EO 8497, July 26, 1940 EO 8904, September 22, 1941
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8257
Authorizing Excepted Appointments To Meet Public Exigency

  • Signed: September 21, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 4023, September 23, 1939
  • Amended by: EO 8564, October 8, 1940
  • Revoked by: EO 9830, February 24, 1947

Executive Order 8258
Amending Paragraph 7, Subdivision I, Schedule A of the Civil Service Rules

Executive Order 8259
Exemption of Harry T. Edwards From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: September 21, 1939
  • See: EO 8525, August 26, 1940 EO 8827, July 24, 1941
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8260
Exemption of James L. Hughes From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: September 21, 1939
  • Amended by: EO 8562, October 8, 1940
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8261
Amendment of Executive Order No. 7972 of September 15, 1938

  • Signed: September 21, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 4043, September 26, 1939
  • Amends: EO 7972, September 15, 1938
  • Revoked by: EO 9687, January 26, 1946

Executive Order 8262
Exemption of Samuel A. Cottrell From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: September 26, 1939
  • See: EO 8555, August 16, 1941 EO 8805, June 25, 1941
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8263
Exemption of William F. Mackenzie From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: September 26, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8264
Appointment of Master Sergeant Morris Swett, United States Army Retired, as Librarian Without Compliance With Civil Service Rules

  • Signed: September 30, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8265
Designation of the Director of the Bureau of Mines To Act as Secretary of the Interior, or as Under Secretary, First Assistant Secretary, or Assistant Secretary of the Interior

Executive Order 8266
Exempting Certain Positions From Salary Classification

  • Signed: October 4, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 4167, October 6, 1939
  • See: EO 6746, June 21, 1934

Executive Order 8267
Amendment of Executive Order No. 7242 of December 6, 1935, Prescribing Regulations Governing Highways, Vehicles, and Vehicular Traffic in the Canal Zone

  • Signed: October 5, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 4183, October 7, 1939
  • Amends: EO 7242, December 6, 1935

Executive Order 8268
Exemption of George W. Stone From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: October 9, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8269
Amendment of Basic Exchange Rates Prescribed by Section 4 of Executive Order No. 7972 of September 15, 1938

  • Signed: October 11, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 4241, October 13, 1939
  • Amends: EO 7972, September 15, 1938
  • Revoked by: EO 9687, January 26, 1946

Executive Order 8270
Exemption of Edward M. Neville From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: October 16, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8271
Amendment of Section 6 of Executive Order No. 8251 of September 12, 1939, Prescribing Regulations Governing the Entrance of Foreign and Domestic Aircraft Into the Canal Zone, and Navigation Therein

  • Signed: October 16, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 4277, October 18, 1939
  • Superseded by: Canal Zone Order 3, January 21, 1947 (12 FR 898)

Executive Order 8272
Amendment of Subdivision VII, Schedule A, Civil Service Rules

Executive Order 8273
Excepting Appointments in the United States Coronado Exposition Commission From the Requirements of the Civil Service Act and Rules

Executive Order 8274
Exemption of Edward A. Neill From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: October 26, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8275
Exemption of Harvey J. Zimmerman From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: October 26, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8276
Extension of Trust Periods on Indian Lands Expiring During Calendar Year 1940

Executive Order 8277
Transfer of Jurisdiction Over Certain Lands From the Secretary of Agriculture to the Secretary of War Oklahoma

  • Signed: October 28, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 4444, November 1, 1939
  • Amends: EO 7908, June 9, 1938
  • Superseded by: EO 9282, December 15, 1942

Executive Order 8278
Withdrawing Public Land and Water for Naval Purposes Alaska

  • Signed: October 28, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 4444, November 1, 1939
  • Revokes: EO 7748, November 20, 1937
  • Amended by: Public Land Order 1182, July 1, 1955 (20 FR 4871)
  • Revoked by: Public Land Order 3705, June 10, 1965 (30 FR 7901) (in part) Public Land Order 4119, December 13, 1966 (31 FR 16202) (in part) Public Land Order 5550, December 1, 1975 (40 FR 56667) (in part)
  • See: EO 8344, February 10, 1940 Public Land Order 2235, December 20, 1960 (25 FR 13696)

Executive Order 8279
Designation of the Director of the Bureau of Mines To Act as Secretary of the Interior, or as Under Secretary, First Assistant Secretary, or Assistant Secretary of the Interior

Executive Order 8280
Amendment of Paragraph 4, Subdivision IV, Schedule B of the Civil Service Rules

Executive Order 8281
Amendment of Executive Order No. 8176 of June 21, 1939, Prescribing Regulations Governing the Grades and Ratings of Enlisted Men of the Regular Army for the Fiscal Year 1940

  • Signed: November 1, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 4453, November 2, 1939
  • Amends: EO 8176, June 21, 1939

Executive Order 8282
Exemption of John S. Biggs From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: November 9, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8283
Amendment of Section 6 of Civil Service Rule II

  • Signed: November 9, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 4565, November 14, 1939
  • Amends: EO 7916, June 24, 1938
  • Amended by: EO 8363, March 4, 1940
  • Revoked by: EO 9830, February 24, 1947

Executive Order 8284
Prescribing the Duties of the Librarian Emeritus of the Library of Congress

Executive Order 8285
Appointment of George K. Briggs Without Regard to Civil Service Rules

  • Signed: November 16, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8286
Exemption of Hugh J. Murray From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: November 16, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8287
Exemption of Arthur H. Chase From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: November 18, 1939
  • Amends: EO 8011, November 19, 1938
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8288
Making Certain Changes in the Field Organization of the Customs Service in the State of Texas

Executive Order 8289
Establishing the Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge

Executive Order 8290
Retirement of Foreign Service Officer Franklin B. Atwood

  • Signed: November 30, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8291
Excusing Federal Employees From Duty on December 23 and 30, 1939

Executive Order 8292
Amending the Foreign Service Regulations of the United States

  • Signed: November 30, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 4761, December 5, 1939
  • Revokes: EO 7470, October 15, 1936
  • Revoked by: EO 9521, February 13, 1945

Executive Order 8293
Suspension of Eight-Hour Law as to Persons Employed by the Government in the Construction of Certain Emergency Air Bases

Executive Order 8294
Appointment of Admiral William D. Leahy, Governor of the Territory of Puerto Rico, as Administrator of the Puerto Rico Reconstruction Administration

  • Signed: November 30, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 4763, December 5, 1939
  • Amends: EO 7057, May 28, 1935 EO 7180, September 6, 1935 EO 7689, August 12, 1937
  • See: EO 8888, September 1, 1941 EO 9278, December 4, 1942 EO 9618, September 19, 1945 EO 9901, October 25, 1947

Executive Order 8295
Partial Revocation of Executive Order of January 3, 1917, and June 16, 1925

  • Signed: November 30, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 4763, December 5, 1939
  • Amends: Executive order of January 3, 1917 (unnumbered series) Executive order of June 16, 1925 (unnumbered series)

Executive Order 8296
Changing the Name of the Pathfinder Wildlife Refuge and Adding Certain Lands Thereto

  • Signed: November 30, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 4763, December 5, 1939
  • Amends: EO 7425, August 1, 1936

Executive Order 8297
Amending the Foreign Service Regulations of the United States

  • Signed: December 4, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 4779, December 7, 1939
  • Amends: EO 7968, September 3, 1938
  • Amended by: EO 9303, February 11, 1943 EO 9407, December 17, 1943
  • Superseded by: Foreign Service Reg. S-6, November 6, 1945 (10 FR 13751)(in part) Foreign Service Reg. S-14, January 8, 1946 (11 FR 527)(in part)
  • Revoked by: EO 9521, February 13, 1945
  • See: EO 9591, July 21, 1945 EO 9767, August 9, 1945

Executive Order 8298
Regulations Governing the Manner of Executing and Returning Commissions by Officers of the Foreign Service in Criminal Cases, and Schedule of Fees and Compensation in Such Cases

  • Signed: December 4, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 4781, December 7, 1939
  • Revoked by: EO 10307, November 23, 1951

Executive Order 8299
Withdrawal of Public Lands Colorado

Executive Order 8300
Amendment of Section 2 (b) of Civil Service Rule VII

  • Signed: December 12, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 4847, December 14, 1939
  • Revoked by: EO 9830, February 24, 1947

Executive Order 8301
Authorizing and Directing Carroll L. Wilson, Special Assistant to the Secretary of Commerce, To Act as Director of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce During the Sickness or Absence of the Director

Executive Order 8302
Exemption of Frank Burke From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: December 12, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8303
Waiver of E.O. of Jan. 17, 1873, To Permit Huntington Cairns To Hold State Office

  • Signed: December 13, 1939
  • See: EO 9, January 17, 1873
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8304
Revocation of Executive Order No. 2552 of March 21, 1917, Withdrawing Public Lands for Lighthouse Purposes Alaska

  • Signed: December 19, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 4909, December 22, 1939
  • Revokes: EO 2552, March 21, 1917

Executive Order 8305
Reserving Certain Public Lands for the Use of the War Department for Military Purposes Alaska

  • Signed: December 19, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 4909, December 22, 1939
  • Revokes: EO 4629, April 13, 1927
  • Amended by: EO 9526, February 28, 1945 Public Land Order 743, August 16, 1951 (16 FR 8366)
  • See: Public Land Order 1491, September 9, 1957 (22 FR 7311)

Executive Order 8306
Taxes and Licenses in the Canal Zone

  • Signed: December 19, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 4909, December 22, 1939
  • Revokes: EO 2062, October 13, 1914
  • See: Canal Zone Order No. 42 (21 FR 582)

Executive Order 8307
Amending the Foreign Service Regulations of the United States

  • Signed: December 19, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 4910, December 22, 1939
  • Revokes: EO 3987, April 4, 1924
  • Revoked by: EO 9521, February 13, 1945

Executive Order 8308
Exemption of Gerrit S. Miller, Jr., From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: December 19, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8309
Exemption of Harry J. Morrison From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: December 19, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8310
Exemption of Louis C. Vogt From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: December 19, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8311
Exemption of Alexander McKeon From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: December 19, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8312
Exemption of David D. Caldwell From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: December 21, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8313
Appointment of Henry Schneider to Treasury Department Without Regard to Civil Service Rules

  • Signed: December 22, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8314
Exemption of John Kieley From Compulsory Retirement for Age

  • Signed: December 22, 1939
  • Note: This Executive order was not received for publication in the Federal Register.

Executive Order 8315
Making Certain Changes in Customs Collection District No. 38 Michigan

Executive Order 8316
Authorizing the Initial Appointment to a Certain Position in the Wage and Hour Division, Department of Labor, Without Compliance With the Civil Service Rules, and Revoking in Part Executive Order No. 8027 of December 23, 1938

  • Signed: December 27, 1939
  • Federal Register page and date: 4 FR 4979, December 30, 1939
  • Amends: EO 8027, December 23, 1938

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1938-1939

1938-1939
By the Autumn of 1938, preparations for War were afoot. Observing the Germans' strategy, modelled upon that of the Spanish and Italian Fascists at Guernica and in Ethiopia (in which units of the Luftwaffe unofficially took part) of terror-bombing of cities, or of more legitimate targets with no regard to civilian casualties, the British Government prepared plans for sending children away from cities and towns if war should be declared. Several official leaflets on this subject are to be found in my archives.+ One can imagine the feelings of my parents as they contemplated sending me away whilst they remained in the danger-zone.
Plans for the removal of children from London were already in hand in September 1938, and Ralph's Kit noted at that time listed Raincoat, Blanket, Wellingtons, Shoes, Gym shoes and togs, Shirt, Vest, Pants, Stockings, Hankies, Towel, Pyjamas, Hair Brush, Tooth Brush, Toothpaste, Money, 6 Postcards, Prayer Book, Diary, Autograph Book, Playing-cards, Mouth-organ, String, Torch. On a memorable day, Tuesday September 27th 1938, I went with my father up to Devonshire Hill School to be fitted with gas-masks. There was a strong smell of new rubber, and there were trestle-tables piled with cardboard boxes, and folk taking names and giving us the correct sizes. The ordinary civilian gas-mask had a single window in front, and straps which went over the head. One breathed in through the metal filter in front, and when breathing out the valve shut and the air escaped under the edges of the rubber where it made a seal with one's cheek. Warnings were issued that the masks should not be tested by putting one's head inside a gas-oven, as they were not designed to deal with coal-gas, but some folk, unaware or forgetful of the warning, did so with fatal consequences.
The gas alert was to be signalled by the sound of large wooden rattles, as used by football-supporters, carried by the Air Raid Wardens. The handle held a spindle armed with cog-wheels, about which, as it was swung around, a frame holding sprung flat wooden strips rotated. As the ends of the strips were raised and released by the teeth of the cog-wheels, they produced a loud clacking.
Pamphlets describing the various characteristic smells of the gases which might be used against us, and warnings about contamination by mustard-gas, were also issued. It was said that one spot of mustard-gas, falling on the toe of one's boot, could rapidly penetrate to the foot and prove sufficient to cause death.
The civil-defence masks, for Air Raid Wardens, Police & Firemen, were of much thicker, moulded rubber, and the exhaled air escaped via a valve which protruded like a little black tongue just between and below the two goggle eye-pieces, blowing an effective raspberry, whilst the serviceman's mask was of tougher construction, a sort of moulded rubberized canvas, and had a tube leading down to a flat filter-canister worn in a satchel on the chest.
Once during the War, we all had to return to such a centre to have a special extra filter attached to our masks, equal in size to a large shoe-polish tin, designed to deal with toxic smokes.
At the outbreak of War, we were advised to carry our gas-masks at all times, and at first we carried them in their cardboard boxes as issued, about 7"x 5"x 4" deep, with a string over the shoulder, but folk soon began buying or making thin canvas covers for the boxes, with a canvas shoulder-strap. Perhaps the official thinking was that the population must be protected against the use of poison gas, and that if the enemy knew we were prepared he would be deterred from deploying it. In fact, it was never used in that War, either against troops in the field or against civilian populations, so the only casualties were those who were foolish enough to test them with coal-gas.
Planning for the Evacuation of children from London and other cities was already in hand. On Monday 26th September that year my mother attended a parents' meeting at my school, and received a form to be signed and details of clothing and other articles I must take if the call came. The Evacuation Number of Tottenham Grammar School was 6339, and the Master-in-Charge was our Art-Master, Mr. Wright. I listened with my father to a speech by Neville Chamberlain at 8 p.m. on the 27th, the news being that Hitler announced his desire to annexe all those parts of Czechoslovakia which had populations of which over 50% were Germans, and on the following day I went to school with my gas-mask and my case packed in readiness, but whilst he was speaking at the Opening of Parliament, Chamberlain received an invitation to go to Munich for a four-power conference, and on the 29th he came home with a Peace Declaration signed by himself and Hitler. Two days later, October 1st, at 2 p.m., German troops entered Czechoslovakia.
On December 8th the Air-Raid Sirens were tested. At that time the sound was merely of novel interest. In my chapter entitled The Blitz is a more detailed description of the sirens and the effect they came to have upon us, and they can be heard on the recording mentioned on Page 35 in my chapter on Radio.
On April 16th 1939 deliveries of Anderson Air-Raid-Shelters began. They were about eight feet long by six wide, of corrugated steel, delivered in sections. The recipients were instructed to dig a hole in the garden about four feet deep, and pile the excavated earth on the top. The door-aperture, in the middle of one end, usually faced the house or a substantial wall which might afford some protection from blast, and was also protected by an upright sheet of the corrugated steel backed by a mound of earth. The Andersons were of course vulnerable to a direct hit, even of a small (100lb) bomb. It was surprising how many people grew marrows on top of their garden shelters that year. We were not eligible to receive an Anderson, I think because my father was paid monthly (salary) rather than weekly (wages), although he received less than many wage-earners. In 1954 I used some of the tall shelter-sections with half-circular-curved tops to make a narrow lean-to shed down the side of my Batley concrete garage at 34 Felstead Road.
On Saturday 26th August we returned home from our fortnight's holiday at Pagham, and discovered that schoolchildren had all been to their schools on that day for evacuation preparations. I went to school on my birthday, the 28th. We heard that Hitler was demanding the occupation of Danzig, and we were at school again the next day. I wrote, School again. Had film show, half-an-hour's break, and mucked about. Afternoon, ditto. We just sat in our desks, minded by a prefect, and amused ourselves as best we might. I suppose the staff were all engaged in the details of our evacuation. It was the towns which were to be evacuated, (emptied), but at that time, with violence to the language, it became common to say that the children were evacuated, a nonsense which spread quickly into the common parlance and has sadly so remained.
On September 1st Germany invaded Poland. I was sent as an evacuee to Danbury, near Chelmsford, my mother went to the friends at Twyford, and my father's office was moved to Valence (Ph2,29), the country house of boss Ronald Vestey (A1,58 A2,22) near Westerham in Kent. On Sunday September 3rd, War was declared.

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Comments:

  1. Vumi

    Very well, that well comes to an end.

  2. Leo

    strongly disagree with the previous sentence

  3. Amen

    Very funny idea

  4. Lludd

    This is a scandal!

  5. Derward

    Great! Finally I found a sensible blog on the Internet) Hurray!

  6. Waverly

    I have removed this phrase

  7. Raedburne

    no need to test everything at once



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